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51
Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1932, 1938-2007
Name: Frank Sexton
Birth Date: 1878
Gender: Male
Race: White
Residence City: Franklin
Residence County: Warren
Residence State: Ohio
Residence Country: United States
Death Date: 6 Mar 1964
Hospital of Death: Public - Other
City of Death: Middletown (Pt)
County of Death: Butler
Certificate: 16325
Age at Death: 86
Certifier: Coroner
Autopsy: Yes, used for certification
County of Injury: Butler
Marital Status: Widowed 
Sexton, Miles Franklin (I20700)
 
52
Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1932, 1938-2007
Name: James C Havens
Birth Date: 1913
Gender: Male
Race: White
Residence City: Middletown
Residence County: Butler
Residence State: Ohio
Death Date: 4 Oct 1974
Hospital of Death: Middletown Hospital
City of Death: Middletown (Pt)
County of Death: Butler
Certificate: 072637
Age at Death: 61
Certifier: Physician
Autopsy: No Autopsy performed
Marital Status: Married

Social Security Death Index, 1935-Current
Name: James Havens
SSN: 289-05-1826
Last Residence: 45042 Middletown, Butler, Ohio
Born: 20 Sep 1913
Died: Oct 1974
State (Year) SSN issued: Ohio (Before 1951)
 
HAVENS, James Cecil (I207)
 
53
Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s
Name: Johan Nickel Heibst
Year: 1764
Place: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Source Publication Code: 7820
Primary Immigrant: Heibst, Johan Nickel

Annotation: An index by Marvin V. Koger, Index to the Names of 30,000 Immigrants...Supplementing the Rupp, Ship Load Volume, 1935, 232p. is inferior to Wecken's index in the third edition (above). Page 449 contains "Names of the First Palatines in North Carolina, as

Source Bibliography: RUPP, ISRAEL DANIEL. A Collection of Upwards of Thirty Thousand Names of German, Swiss, Dutch, French and Other Immigrants in Pennsylvania from 1727 to 1776, with a Statement of the Names of Ships, Whence They Sailed, and the Date of Their Arrival at Philadelphia, Chronologically Arranged, Together with the Necessary Historical and Other Notes, also, an Appendix Containing Lists of More Than One Thousand German and French Names in New York prior to 1712. Leipzig [Germany]:
Page: 357

Namen von Einwanderern in Pennsylvanien aus Deutschland, der Schweiz, Holland, Frankreich u. a. St. von 1727 bis 1776 (Names of immigrants in Pennsylvania from Germany, Switzerland, Holland, France and other countries from 1727 to 1776) Record for Namen von Einwanderern in Pennsylvanien aus Deutschland, der Schweiz, Holland, Frankreich u. a. St. von 1727 bis 1776 (Names of immigrants in Pennsylvania from Germany, Switzerland, Holland, France and other countries from 1727 to 1776)

Sept. 19, 1764, Ship: Polly, Robert Porter, Captain, from Rotterdam, last from Cowes, Six Roman Catholics, 184 passengers.

On passenger list, p. 357

Johan Nickel Heibst 
Heibst, Johann Nicholas (I5808)
 
54
Pennsylvania Census, 1772-1890
Name: Nicholas Wamser
State: PA
County: Philadelphia County
Township: Philadelphia
Year: 1748
Database: PA Early Census Index

Jackson, Ronald V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.. Pennsylvania Census, 1772-1890 [database on-line]. Provo, UT 
Wamser, Nicholas (I9151)
 
55
REFERENCES

History of York, Maine- Banks, Vol.I, pp.206-9.

York Co. Court Records- Vol.II, p.205; Vol.III, p.42,p.54; Vol.IV, p.61.

Genealogical Dictionary of Maine & New Hampshire- p.721
York Deeds- Vol.4, p.159.

Mass. Archives- Vol.3, pp.385-6; Vol.11, pp.125-125a, p.127a;
Vol.3, p.394a.

York Co. Probate- I, 85; II, 66.

History and Genealogy of the Stackpole Family- pp.61-2.

Adriel Warren of Berwick, ME: His Forebears and Descendants- Vanetta Hosford Warren, Boston, 1969.

Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society- Vol.LXI, pp.16-29.
 
WARREN, James (I7076)
 
56
Southern Asia Tidings,vol. 78, No. 10 October, 1983

BEGINNINGS OF SDA [Seventh Day Adventist] WORK IN ASSAM
MIRIAM HARDINGE

One day in the year 1908 a Seventh-day Adventist Colporteur
knocked at door number 49 Wellesley Street, in a residential area of Calcutta, India. She was shown into
the presence of the lady of the house, and presented her canvass. The lady showed little interest in the religious books the colporteur was displaying, and was preparing to
usher the unwanted visitor out when she was struck with an idea. "Now, if you were only selling a cookbook that would show me how to cook without meat, I would be interested," she said. "The market is a disgrace and I don't want to buy anything more from it. I would like to learn how to manage without the disease-laden meat that is all that is
obtainable here," she continued.

"Madam, I think I can help you with that," replied the book saleswoman, "Just wait for a few days and I will be back with a book of vegetarian recipes." True to her word the colporteur returned a few days later with a vegetarian cookbook. While the lady was scanning the recipes in rapture, the colporteur asked, "Do you know how to cook vegetarian food?"

"No!" she replied, and then asked, "Do you?" "Yes!" was the response. "Would you care for me to demonstrate how to prepare some vegetarian dishes?" she then asked politely.
"Why, yes," hesitantly replied the lady of the house, "but would that not be an imposition?" "It can be easily arranged," replied the colporteur. And so it happened that a few days later the local Adventist Bible Instructor who was the colporteur, again presented herself at the
Hardinge home.

Constance Hardinge took to her immediately, and she and the Indian cook were soon turning out surprisingly tasty dishes without the help of meat under the Bible Instructor's tutellage. Dr. Mervyn Hardinge still has this cook book and on the fly leaf is written "Constance Hardinge, 1908."

As for the Bible Instructor, she was far more interested in giving the Hardinge family spiritual food than in improving their menus, important though it was. With wisdom and heavenly tact she unfolded the truths of the third angel's message, until first Constance Hardinge, and then her husband and their two children, Phyllis and Ivan, accepted
the Lord and were eventually baptized, and became early members of the Seventh-day Adventist church in Calcutta.

Several years passed by, and one day in 1915 Mr. Hardinge received word that the survey department of the government of India, for whom he worked, was about to transfer him
to a more responsible position. "I don't know where it will be," he told his wife.

"Oh, I hope it is in the northwest somewhere," said Mrs. Hardinge, "You know there is a good Seventh- day Adventist school, Vincent Hill, in Mussouri. How wonderful it
would be if we were sent somewhere near, so that we could send Phyllis and Ivan to it. "Yes, wouldn't it!" acquiesced Mr. Hardinge, "and it won't be many more years before Leslie and Mervyn will be readv for school. Let's pray
that the government will send us near Mussouri."

So daily their prayers ascended for the move to be in the westerly direction of Mussouri, but always they ended with the words, "Thy will be done." But it was not God's will. When the orders came, Mr. Hardinge was invited to be the officer-in-charge of the Assam Survey and Traverse Party
with the responsibility of making revenue maps of the province of Assam, located eastward, an area that
had never been completely surveyed. The family would live in Shillong, the capital of Assam.

Assam! it was as far from Mussouri where they longed to go as it could be! Their disappointment was great. How could this be God's will? they were tempted to ask. But it must be! So instead of attending a Seventh-day Adventist school the Hardinge children were obliged to look for their
education to the Catholic schools found in Shillong.
Was this God's will?

Back in Calcutta Mr. Hardinge had made inquiries about the church in Shillong. They had so much enjoyed the fellowship in the Calcutta church and looked forward to being united
with the Adventist family in their new station. "There is no church there," he was told. "Nor is there an Adventist in the whole of Assam," the mission added with regret.
"No church?" "No, and no believers there at all?
yet! You will be isolated members," he was informed. So the Hardinges moved to Shillong in 1915, and did the best they
could to witness for Christ in the circumstances. They subscribed to The Review and Herald, The Youth's Instructor, and Our little Friend and bought Advenrist and other good books by Ellen White as they came out. In Shillong they made every Sabbath a special day for their family. On fine days they would seek out a beautiful spot beneath some trees, and have Sabbath School and take turns reading from papers and books, and they would hike in the beautiful hills around Shillong, especially beyond the Polo grounds.

On rare occasions, every three or four years, a pastor from the mission office in Calcutta would make the long trip to look up these isolated members and encourage them. Pastors Wilson, Wellman, Wyman and Raymond were given great welcomes when they took the trouble to visit them. The Gilliards from Australia, and their family stayed in
Shillong for a year, fostering the interests.

The concern which the Hardinges felt went beyond their own family to their neighbours. Invitations were given first to the friends of the children Phyllis and Ivan, and then to
their parents, to join the family group on Friday evening for hymn singing, and later for Sabbath Bible studies.
Personal Bible studies followed, and in due course one of the visiting pastors was called upon to conduct a baptism. In 1928 the first baptism was carried out by Pastor Keller. It consisted of an 84 year old man, Mr. Matthews, and Leslie and Mervyn Hardinge in a stream called the Umkhrah. Then Mr. Doram was baptized and began to sell Adventist
books. Soon there was a little company in the Hardinge living room at Shillong on Bancroft Road.

But even that was not enough for the missionary-minded Hardinges. Often Mr. Hardinge would lift up his eyes to the Khasi Hills among which they lived. They were populated by
simple, untaught people, many of whom were bound in the chains of heathen worship and animistic customs. They needed the Gospel.

Who was to take it to them? He seemed to hear a Voice saying, "You, Mr. Hardinge." "But I don't know the language," was his excuse. But God does not receive our excuses when they try to get us out of serving Him.
Painstakingly he wrote a tract in English. In simple words it told the story of the Gospel embedded in the doctrines of the Adventist message, in words which the Holy Spirit made appealing and beautiful. As Mr. Hardinge travelled up and down Assam, he became known as the sahib who did not smoke or drink, did not eat meat and kept the Sabbath as his
holy day.

An employee in Mr. Hardinge's office was familiar with the Khasi language, so he paid him to make a translation of the tract he had written into Khasi. To make sure that every-
thing was correct and clear Mr. Hardinge had someone else who knew Khasi translate and read it back to him in Bengali! At last satisfied that the tract said what he intended, Mr. Hardinge had it printed at hisown cost. And as he went into the hill country on his survey trips he took
along copies and distributed them far and wide.

God had promised that His Word will not return unto Him void, and so it was that one by one as a result of this little Khasi tract, people came to learn more of the message contained in it. The Gospel light was spreading!
There were young people among those who made inquiries and
listened to the teaching of the Word, and the Hardinges thought to themselves, "There should be a school to train these young people."

More years went by. All but one of Surat the Hardinge children left to seek higher education in England. Retirement time was coming around. The Hardinges felt that they would need to sell their home and leave India. But
because times were changing in India, it was getting more and more difficult for Europeans to sell their property at a fair price. There were no bids for the Hardinge home for
some time. They prayed about it, of course. Then an idea struck! They changed the mode of their praying!"Lord," they prayed, "if Thou wilt send a buyer for our house, we will
give a portion towards the establishment of a training school for the mountain young people."

It was certainly no coincidence that in a very short while someone bought the house for a fair price and the Hardinges kept their promise and turned in part of the proceeds to the
mission towards a fund to establish what was to become the Jowai Training School?later the Assam Training School.

In 1933 the Hardinges retired and left Assam never to
return. Had God disregarded their prayer request when they asked to be sent to the Mussouri area? Far from it. It was
his purpose for the Hardinges to let their light shine in that dark area of India? light that has spread into many of Assam's hills and valleys and brought the peace of God to many a heart.

The health message that the Adventist church had to offer, attracted Mrs. Hardinge and led the whole family into
the church. Therefore, it is not surprising that one of their sons, Dr. Mervyn G. Hardinge, is the Director of Health and Temperance of the General Conference. Dr. Leslie G. Hardinge, one of the other sons visited India last year. He is connected with the Theology Department of
the Philippine Union College. Dr. Mervyn Hardinge will be visiting Southern Asia Divison to acquaint with the
Health and Temperance work in this Division. This will be his first visit since he left this country as a boy.

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:5fVSGAkXnB0J:www.adventistarchives.org/docs/SAT/SAT19831001-V78-10__B.pdf+&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEEShRfx2pdyuWjKz4ziQotrR-5Q8eSfq85ESBc27a8W1rw5s9Zo--UkaTI2v5jRFPNMnaWKkSpcAh8cY2YkyDWq1KR3iaBQ2SMCYWH65ou5yOvbPSUxu26OTwcBsn9bRbgBiPGg94&sig=AHIEtbTq5yNIpRSsQbKxiL-dOpxygtGzRQ 
WILSON, Constance (I2402)
 
57
Southern Asia Tidings,vol. 78, No. 10 October, 1983

BEGINNINGS OF SDA [Seventh Day Adventist] WORK IN ASSAM
MIRIAM HARDINGE

One day in the year 1908 a Seventh-day Adventist Colporteur
knocked at door number 49 Wellesley Street, in a residential area of Calcutta, India. She was shown into
the presence of the lady of the house, and presented her canvass. The lady showed little interest in the religious books the colporteur was displaying, and was preparing to
usher the unwanted visitor out when she was struck with an idea. "Now, if you were only selling a cookbook that would show me how to cook without meat, I would be interested," she said. "The market is a disgrace and I don't want to buy anything more from it. I would like to learn how to manage without the disease-laden meat that is all that is
obtainable here," she continued.

"Madam, I think I can help you with that," replied the book saleswoman, "Just wait for a few days and I will be back with a book of vegetarian recipes." True to her word the colporteur returned a few days later with a vegetarian cookbook. While the lady was scanning the recipes in rapture, the colporteur asked, "Do you know how to cook vegetarian food?"

"No!" she replied, and then asked, "Do you?" "Yes!" was the response. "Would you care for me to demonstrate how to prepare some vegetarian dishes?" she then asked politely.
"Why, yes," hesitantly replied the lady of the house, "but would that not be an imposition?" "It can be easily arranged," replied the colporteur. And so it happened that a few days later the local Adventist Bible Instructor who was the colporteur, again presented herself at the
Hardinge home.

Constance Hardinge took to her immediately, and she and the Indian cook were soon turning out surprisingly tasty dishes without the help of meat under the Bible Instructor's tutellage. Dr. Mervyn Hardinge still has this cook book and on the fly leaf is written "Constance Hardinge, 1908."

As for the Bible Instructor, she was far more interested in giving the Hardinge family spiritual food than in improving their menus, important though it was. With wisdom and heavenly tact she unfolded the truths of the third angel's message, until first Constance Hardinge, and then her husband and their two children, Phyllis and Ivan, accepted
the Lord and were eventually baptized, and became early members of the Seventh-day Adventist church in Calcutta.

Several years passed by, and one day in 1915 Mr. Hardinge received word that the survey department of the government of India, for whom he worked, was about to transfer him
to a more responsible position. "I don't know where it will be," he told his wife.

"Oh, I hope it is in the northwest somewhere," said Mrs. Hardinge, "You know there is a good Seventh- day Adventist school, Vincent Hill, in Mussouri. How wonderful it
would be if we were sent somewhere near, so that we could send Phyllis and Ivan to it. "Yes, wouldn't it!" acquiesced Mr. Hardinge, "and it won't be many more years before Leslie and Mervyn will be readv for school. Let's pray
that the government will send us near Mussouri."

So daily their prayers ascended for the move to be in the westerly direction of Mussouri, but always they ended with the words, "Thy will be done." But it was not God's will. When the orders came, Mr. Hardinge was invited to be the officer-in-charge of the Assam Survey and Traverse Party
with the responsibility of making revenue maps of the province of Assam, located eastward, an area that
had never been completely surveyed. The family would live in Shillong, the capital of Assam.

Assam! it was as far from Mussouri where they longed to go as it could be! Their disappointment was great. How could this be God's will? they were tempted to ask. But it must be! So instead of attending a Seventh-day Adventist school the Hardinge children were obliged to look for their
education to the Catholic schools found in Shillong.
Was this God's will?

Back in Calcutta Mr. Hardinge had made inquiries about the church in Shillong. They had so much enjoyed the fellowship in the Calcutta church and looked forward to being united
with the Adventist family in their new station. "There is no church there," he was told. "Nor is there an Adventist in the whole of Assam," the mission added with regret.
"No church?" "No, and no believers there at all?
yet! You will be isolated members," he was informed. So the Hardinges moved to Shillong in 1915, and did the best they
could to witness for Christ in the circumstances. They subscribed to The Review and Herald, The Youth's Instructor, and Our little Friend and bought Advenrist and other good books by Ellen White as they came out. In Shillong they made every Sabbath a special day for their family. On fine days they would seek out a beautiful spot beneath some trees, and have Sabbath School and take turns reading from papers and books, and they would hike in the beautiful hills around Shillong, especially beyond the Polo grounds.

On rare occasions, every three or four years, a pastor from the mission office in Calcutta would make the long trip to look up these isolated members and encourage them. Pastors Wilson, Wellman, Wyman and Raymond were given great welcomes when they took the trouble to visit them. The Gilliards from Australia, and their family stayed in
Shillong for a year, fostering the interests.

The concern which the Hardinges felt went beyond their own family to their neighbours. Invitations were given first to the friends of the children Phyllis and Ivan, and then to
their parents, to join the family group on Friday evening for hymn singing, and later for Sabbath Bible studies.
Personal Bible studies followed, and in due course one of the visiting pastors was called upon to conduct a baptism. In 1928 the first baptism was carried out by Pastor Keller. It consisted of an 84 year old man, Mr. Matthews, and Leslie and Mervyn Hardinge in a stream called the Umkhrah. Then Mr. Doram was baptized and began to sell Adventist
books. Soon there was a little company in the Hardinge living room at Shillong on Bancroft Road.

But even that was not enough for the missionary-minded Hardinges. Often Mr. Hardinge would lift up his eyes to the Khasi Hills among which they lived. They were populated by
simple, untaught people, many of whom were bound in the chains of heathen worship and animistic customs. They needed the Gospel.

Who was to take it to them? He seemed to hear a Voice saying, "You, Mr. Hardinge." "But I don't know the language," was his excuse. But God does not receive our excuses when they try to get us out of serving Him.
Painstakingly he wrote a tract in English. In simple words it told the story of the Gospel embedded in the doctrines of the Adventist message, in words which the Holy Spirit made appealing and beautiful. As Mr. Hardinge travelled up and down Assam, he became known as the sahib who did not smoke or drink, did not eat meat and kept the Sabbath as his
holy day.

An employee in Mr. Hardinge's office was familiar with the Khasi language, so he paid him to make a translation of the tract he had written into Khasi. To make sure that every-
thing was correct and clear Mr. Hardinge had someone else who knew Khasi translate and read it back to him in Bengali! At last satisfied that the tract said what he intended, Mr. Hardinge had it printed at hisown cost. And as he went into the hill country on his survey trips he took
along copies and distributed them far and wide.

God had promised that His Word will not return unto Him void, and so it was that one by one as a result of this little Khasi tract, people came to learn more of the message contained in it. The Gospel light was spreading!
There were young people among those who made inquiries and
listened to the teaching of the Word, and the Hardinges thought to themselves, "There should be a school to train these young people."

More years went by. All but one of Surat the Hardinge children left to seek higher education in England. Retirement time was coming around. The Hardinges felt that they would need to sell their home and leave India. But
because times were changing in India, it was getting more and more difficult for Europeans to sell their property at a fair price. There were no bids for the Hardinge home for
some time. They prayed about it, of course. Then an idea struck! They changed the mode of their praying!"Lord," they prayed, "if Thou wilt send a buyer for our house, we will
give a portion towards the establishment of a training school for the mountain young people."

It was certainly no coincidence that in a very short while someone bought the house for a fair price and the Hardinges kept their promise and turned in part of the proceeds to the
mission towards a fund to establish what was to become the Jowai Training School?later the Assam Training School.

In 1933 the Hardinges retired and left Assam never to
return. Had God disregarded their prayer request when they asked to be sent to the Mussouri area? Far from it. It was
his purpose for the Hardinges to let their light shine in that dark area of India? light that has spread into many of Assam's hills and valleys and brought the peace of God to many a heart.

The health message that the Adventist church had to offer, attracted Mrs. Hardinge and led the whole family into
the church. Therefore, it is not surprising that one of their sons, Dr. Mervyn G. Hardinge, is the Director of Health and Temperance of the General Conference. Dr. Leslie G. Hardinge, one of the other sons visited India last year. He is connected with the Theology Department of
the Philippine Union College. Dr. Mervyn Hardinge will be visiting Southern Asia Divison to acquaint with the
Health and Temperance work in this Division. This will be his first visit since he left this country as a boy.

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:5fVSGAkXnB0J:www.adventistarchives.org/docs/SAT/SAT19831001-V78-10__B.pdf+&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEEShRfx2pdyuWjKz4ziQotrR-5Q8eSfq85ESBc27a8W1rw5s9Zo--UkaTI2v5jRFPNMnaWKkSpcAh8cY2YkyDWq1KR3iaBQ2SMCYWH65ou5yOvbPSUxu26OTwcBsn9bRbgBiPGg94&sig=AHIEtbTq5yNIpRSsQbKxiL-dOpxygtGzRQ 
HARDINGE, Eustace Gilbert (I2401)
 
58
WILL OF ELISHA TATE
Russell County, Virginia
Will Book 7, Pages 124-125
Executed 06 Jul 1858

I Elisha Tate of the County of Russell and State of VA do hereby make my last Will and Testament in manner and form following that is to say.

1st: I desire that after my decease that there be enough of my perishable property sold to pay my funeral expenses and just debts.

2nd: I desire that my wife Eliza Tate have the remaining property, all my land household and kitchen furniture with all my farming utensils during her natural life or widowhood.

3rd: I desire my single daughters Hannah F. Tate, Eliza C Tate, Darthula H. Tate and Sarah E. Tate have a place of residence with their mother so long as they remain single, also to be made equal with the other girls.

4th: I desire at the death of my wife Eliza Tate that my land be equally divided between my two sons James M. Tate and Thomas F. Tate to have and to hold forever. I further desire Robt. Fugate and Samuel P. Fugate make the division between my two sons James & Thos. F. Tate. I desire that the division of my land be immediately made after my decease.

5th: I also desire that my two sons James and Thos. F. Tate pay to my daughters Nancy, Jane, Hannah, Eliza, Darthula & Sarah E. Tate three hundred dollars to each one to be paid six months after the decease of my wife Eliza Tate.

6th: I desire that after the death of my wife Eliza Tate that all the remaining part of my property household kitchen furniture and farming utensils be sold and equally divided among all my children.

7th: I desire that when the division is made in my land that the house that my son James built is not to be taken in consideration with the value of the land. I also desire that my son James M. Tate have the north side of my land as he built on the same.

And Lastly: I do hereby constitute and appoint Samuel P. Fugate and James M. Tate executors of this my last Will and Testament hereby revoking all other or former Wills or Testaments by me heretofore made.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this 17th day of May 1858.

Elisha Tate (seal)

Signed sealed published and
declared as and for the last
Will & Testament of the above
names Elisha Tate in
presence of us

James S. Glenn
John W. Owens

At a court held for Russell County on the 6th day of July 1858
The last Will and Testament of Elisha Tate deceased was produced in court and proved by the oaths of James S. Glenn and John W. Owens the two subscribing witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded. And on the motion of James M Tate one of the executors therein named who took the oath of an executor prescribed by law and entered into and acknowledged his bond in the sum of $2000.00 with James S. Glenn and Joseph E Fugate as his security conditioned as the law directs. A certificate is therefore granted him for obtaining probate of the said Will in due form.

Teste
R. H. Lynch C.C. 
TATE, Elisha (I5243)
 
59
CENSUS RECORDS

1820 United States Federal Census
Name: Thomas Christian
Home in 1820 (City, County, State): Tazewell, Virginia
Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820
Free White Persons - Males - Under 10: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 15: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 16 thru 18: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 16 thru 25: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 45 and over: 1
Free White Persons - Females - Under 10: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 45 and over : 1
Number of Persons - Engaged in Agriculture: 3
Free White Persons - Under 16: 4
Free White Persons - Over 25: 2
Total Free White Persons: 8
Total All Persons - White, Slaves, Colored, Other: 8

1830 United States Federal Census
Name: Thomas Christian
Home in 1830 (City, County, State): Tazewell, Virginia
Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 50 thru 59: 1
Free White Persons - Females - Under 5: 2
Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 15 thru 19: 2
Free White Persons - Females - 30 thru 39: 2
Free White Persons - Under 20: 7
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
Total Free White Persons: 10

1840 United States Federal Census
Name: Thomas Christian
Home in 1840 (City, County, State): Tazewell, Virginia
Free White Persons - Males - Under 5: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 60 thru 69: 1
Free White Persons - Females - Under 5: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 15 thru 19: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 30 thru 39: 1
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 2
No. White Persons over 20 Who Cannot Read and Write: 2
Free White Persons - Under 20: 5
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
Total Free White Persons: 8
Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 8

1850 United States Federal Census
Name: Thos Christian
Age: 80
Birth Year: abt 1770
Birthplace: Virginia
Home in 1850: Western District, Tazewell, Virginia
Gender: Male
Family Number: 1170
Household Members:
Thos Christian 80
Mary Christian 40
Mathias Christian 16
George Christian 14
Susana Christian 13
Sally Christian 10
Letty Christian 8 
CHRISTIAN, Thomas Bailey (I4414)
 
60
RECORDS ON THOMAS BAILEY CHRISTIAN

Source: "Reed and Related Families of Tazewell County, Virginia and McDowell County, West Virginia", by Juanita S Halstead.

From various records extant today, we have found that Thomas Christian was orphaned and raised by Major Thomas Mastin. We do know that he appears in Tazewell County
records as early as 1806, and that he owned several tracts of land, making his home on the Sinking Waters in that county. There is a case on record in Augusta County, VA in which Thomas Christian had a suit against John Wray over this land on the Sinking Waters of Tazewell County.

LAND RECORDS

Land Grants

Thomas Christian - 21 Feb 1785
Montgomery County
255 a. On Brush Creek, a branch of Bluestone the waters of New River
Grants No. N, p. 696 [This could be Thomas (13) or Thomas (18) depending on where the Montgomery County border fell. More research needed.]

Record of the Taxes in Sumner County for the Year 1792
Thomas Christian, 1 poll, tax 1 pound. Next household is Thomas Mastin.

Chalkley's Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish there is a lawsuit "Thomas Christian vs. Wray" 23 Jul 1803 which in a nutshell states Joseph Wray obtained certificate by right of settlment in Washington (afterwards Russell) now Tazewell Co. Joseph d. intestate, leaving son John Wray heir-at-law. John Wray sold a piece of land twice - first to Thomas Christian, of Sumner Co, territory south of the Ohio, by deed dated 26 Sep 1794 and then sold it a second time to Craven Belsha who bribed him......it states Thomas Christian was an orphan. Thomas Christian won the case.

Thomas Christian - 17 Jun 1824
Tazewell County
40 a. On Indian Creek
Grants No. 73, p. 180

Thomas Christian - 17 Jun 1824
Tazewell County
120 a. On Indian Creek
Grants No. 73, p. 192

Thomas Christian - 6 Sept 1826
Tazewell County
15 a. On Tug River and lower end of his land
Grants No. 75, p. 274

Thomas Christian - 10 Jul 1826
Tazewell County
58 a. On the Tug fork of Sandy River
Grants No. 78, p. 228

Thomas Christian - 21 Mar 1836
Tazewell County
77 a. At the mouth of Crain (sic) Creek
Grants No. 85, p. 403

Thomas Christian - 1 May 1855
(of David)
Tazewell County
392 a. On Left hand fork of Indian Creek of Clinch
Grants No. 111, p. 180

Thomas B. Christian - 1 Jun 1856
Tazewell County
140 a. On a ridge dividing waters of Indian Creek from Middle Creek
Grants No. 112, p. 547
 
CHRISTIAN, Thomas Bailey (I4414)
 
61 From the unpublished manuscript, Indian Atrocities Along the Clinch, Powell and Holston Rivers, by Emory L. Hamilton pages 164-172.

This family of Harmans were of German origin, Adam Heinrich Hermann emigrating to America in 1726, with a brief stop over the Isle of Man, where Henry Harman of this sketch wasborn. Seven Harman brothers emigrated from Germany together, Jacob, Valentine, Mathias, George, Daniel, John, and Heinrich Adam. They first stopped off in Pennsylvania, then emigrated to the Shenandoah Valley and some on into North Carolina. At least three of these brothers settled in Southwest Virginia, namely, Heinrich Adam, Valentin and Jacob. They were living in the New River German settlement, the first settlement ever made west of the Alleghenies on the "Western Waters", and were living there prior to 1745. In 1749 Moravian Missionaries conducted the first recorded religious services in Southwest Virginia in the home of Jacob Harman, and Dr. Thomas Walker mentions stopping at the home of Harman on his memorable exploration trip in 1750.

Valentine and Jacob were both killed by Indians on New River. Valentine was killed on Sinking Creek in what is now Giles Co., VA. In a land suit filed in the High Court of
Chancery in Augusta Co., on the 23rd of July, 1807, Taylor vs Harman, Mathias Harman, nephew of the slain Valentine, says: Valentine was killed by the Indians on New River and at the same time his (Mathias') brother, Daniel Harman and Andrew Moser were taken prisoner. Daniel made his escape, but Andrew was held prisoner.

On the 30th of June, 1808, Daniel Harman, deposes, in the same land suit, saying: In 1757, Valentine was killed in my presence less than a foot away from me, and I was taken prisoner. Valentine Harman, who was slain left a widow
Mary Harman, but no children.

The Harmans of this sketch are the descendants of Heinrich Adam Hermann who emigrated from Germany, who married Louisa
Katrina, October 8, 1723. Louisa Katrina died March 18, 1749. The children of this marriage were:

[1] Adam Harman, the eldest, born in Germany in 1724;

[2] Henry Harman born on the Isle of Man in 1726;

[3] George Harman, 1727 - 1749;

[4] Daniel Harman, born Pennsylvania, 1729;

[5] Mathias Harman, born near Strausburg, VA, in 1736;

[6] Christina Harman, who married Jeremiah Pate, and lived on Little River in Montgomery Co., VA;

[7] Catherine Harman who married Ulrich Richards in Rowan Co., NC;

[8] Phillipina Harman, who died in 1751;

[9] Valentine Harman who settled on the upper Clinch River in 1771, and moved to Lincoln Co., KY, about 1775, and was a member of the Henderson Legislature at Boonesboro in May, 1775;

[10] A daughter, name unknown, married a Mr. Looney;

[11] Jacob Harman, perhaps the Jacob who settled in Tazewell
Co., VA in 1771.

The sons of old Heinrich Adam Hermann, the German emigrant, became great hunters and Indian fighters. While most of them were great hunters, one in particular became one of the noted Long Hunters. It is hard to determine just which
son this was, but evidence points to the youngest who was Jacob.

Sources:

Calender Virginia State Papers, Vol. IV, page 564.
Harman Genealogy by John Newton Harman
Augusta Court Causes Ended, Taylor vs Harman.
Augusta Court Causes Ended, Wynn vs Inglish heirs.

 
HARMAN, Jacob (I4522)
 
62 FIRST 100 YEARS NOLAN COUNTY TEXAS:

GEORGE WARNER ALTIZER
Page 92

The marriage of George Warner Altizer and Bertha Taylor in Cherokee, Texas, in 1898, began a chapter in Nolan County history that is still being written.

After the birth of their first child, a son, they decided to leave San Saba County and move to West Texas. After a long wagon ride of several days, they settled in Hylton, where their daughter was born and where G. W. carried the mail. He rode horseback into Sweetwater daily, becoming the sole contact between the pioneers of Hylton and the outside world. One day, he returned from his route to find his daughter seriously ill. Before he could fetch a doctor, miles away, his two-year-old baby, Deloris, had died. The next night his daughter, Lerline was born.

In 1903, he moved to Roscoe where he began moving houses with Gus Martin by mule team. In 1904, he moved to Sweetwater where he went into the house moving business for himself and built his home, where, a year later, his son, Buster, was born. He bought the first Orient depot and moved it to his home place to use as a tool house. It is still in use. In 1906, another daughter, Callie, and in 1914, another daughter, Doris, were born.

His wife, Bertha, was a member of a small group of Christians who were meeting in each other's homes or any place available, so G. W. donated the land for a small church building where they met for a few years. They speedily grew in number, badly needing a larger building, so G. W. moved it for them to the corner of Fourth and Elm Streets, where they built a large building and where it stands today (now Fourth & Elm Church of Christ).

In 1935, Bertha Altizer died and in 1949, G. W. Altizer died. Both were buried in Sweetwater Cemetery.

Their homeplace in Sweetwater is still occupied and enjoyed by part of their family who love Sweetwater and are helping it grow.

By Callie Altizer Seago 
Taylor, Bertha (I16518)
 
63 He went to Alabama or Mississippi and did not live long.  MCCLUNG, Franklin (I16183)
 
64 Indexes of Vital Records for Georgia: Deaths, 1919-1998
Name: Hoke B Duke
Death Date: 29 Jun 1984
County of Death: Carroll
Gender: M (Male)
Race: White
Age: 76 Years
County of Residence: Carroll
Certificate: 023120
Date Filed: 11 Jul 1984 
DUKE, Hoke Blant (I29264)
 
65 Joseph Dow. "History of the Town of Hampton, NH, from its Settlement in 1638 to the Autumn of 1892". pub. 1893; reprinted in 1988, p.778.  Knowles, John (I24966)
 
66 Name of father James L. Titus
Maiden name of mother Mercy Barnes

MARRIAGE - David J. Whiteaker to Lucy L. Titus on 19 Mar 1871 in Walla Walla Co., Washington. (Source - Washington State Digital Archives, Marriage Records)

1850 IN CENSUS - Lucy L. Titus, age 6, b. Indiana, is enumerated with James Titus, age 30, occupation farmer, b. Canada, and Mercy, age 24, b. Canada. Also enumerated with the family are Lucy Barnes, age 52, b. Canada, Nancy Barnes, age 19, b. Michigan, and Leepman Barnes, age 12, b. Indiana.

1920 WA CENSUS - Lucy L. Whiteaker, age 75, widowed, b. Indiana.

DEATH - Lucy L. Whiteaker, d. 21 Jul 1925 in Eltopia, Franklin Co., Washington, at the age of 81 years. Name of father J. L. Titys [Titus], maiden name of mother Mersey [Mercy] Barnes. (Source - Washington State Digital Archives, Death Records)


OBITUARY:
Mrs. Louise L. Whiteaker, widow of David Whiteaker and one of the pioneer settlers of Polk county, died at the home of her niece in Eltopia, Washington, Tuesday, July 21. Her remains were brought to Independence where funeral services were held in the Methodist church yesterday forenoon at 11 o??clock. Burial was in the Whiteaker cemetery north of Monmouth. Her husband was a kinsman of John Whiteaker the first governor of Oregon after it was admitted to the union as a state. He held office from March 3, 1859, to September 10, 1862. David Whiteaker farmed it on the place now occupied by the Rineys but moved to Independence and lived there half a century. A short time ago she went to live with the niece in Eltopia. Mrs. Whiteaker was an ardent temperance worker, was a charter member of the Independence W.C.T.U. and was a member of the Methodist church.
Monmouth Herald, Friday, 24 Jul 1925, 1:3

Mrs Lucy Luvica Whiteaker, affectionately known as "Aunt Lou," died at the home of her niece, Mrs. Emma Johnson, at Eltopia, Wash, July 21, She had been ill for a long time, going from here to Eltopia several months ago in order to be with relatives during her final illness.

Mrs. Whiteaker was exceedingly active in church and teperance circles for many years, and has been proclaimed the "mother of prohibition in Polk county."

Mrs. Whiteaker was born March 20, 1844, at La Port, Indiana, a daughter of James L. and Mercy Titus. She was married to David J. Whiteaker at Waitsburg, Wash, March 19, 1871. Shortly afterward they came to Polk county in the company of Mr. Whiteaker's two brothers, George and Ben Whiteaker, all three acquiring farms a few miles north of Monmouth on what is now the Pacific highway.

Mr. and Mrs. Whiteaker made their home on the ranch until about 22 years ago, when they moved to Talmage. Mr. Whiteaker died about 17 or 18 years ago as the result of injuries sustained by being thrown from a wagon. Mrs. Whiteaker came to Independence to reside from Talmage and became more deeply involved than ever in her church and temperance work.

For many years Mrs. Whiteaker directed the affairs of the Loyal Temperance Legion, interesting boys and girls of tender age in the project, impressing upon them a lasting lesson in the right way of living. The legion met every Sunday afternoon in the Methodist church and nothing but an extraordinary cause kept Aunt Lou from being there to lead the organization in its mission. She continued with it until illness finally forced her to relinquish the work but a few months ago.

Funeral services were held at the Methodist church here July 23 at 11 o'clock in the morning. Rev J.S. Green of Sheridan, a former pastor of the church, assisted by Rev F.C. Becker, officiated. He eulogized the sacrificing life which Mrs Whiteaker had led in order to carry out her fixed purpose of accomplishment "a rock of righteousness and tenderness." Burial was made in a private plot on what is known as the Ben Whiteaker ranch and where she spent many years of her life. The pall bearers were W.G. Grant, Charles Smiley, Peter Ingermanson, Peter Kurre, Burris Estes and J.W. Kelley. There was a profusion of beautiful flowers ? the offerings of loving hands? and symbolic of the love and veneration in which Aunt Lou was held. She had no children but took three children of a sister, now Mrs. Emma Johnson, J.L. and Frank Coquillette, and cared for them to maturity with loving kindness. Mrs. Nancy Whiteaker is a sister-in-law and Mrs E.E. Tripp is a niece. There are also other relatives.
Independence Enterprise, Friday, 24 Jul 1925, 1:1

INSCRIPTION:
Lucy L. His Wife
1844 - [1925]
(shares marker with husband David) 
TITUS, Lucy Louise (I962)
 
67 National Archives and Records Administration. Register, World War II Dead Interred in American Military Cemeteries on Foreign Soil and World War II and Korea Missing or Lost or Buried at Sea. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration.

Name: Forest H Phifer
Inducted From: Tennessee
Rank: First Lieutenant
Combat Organization: 564th Bomber Squadron 389th Bomber
Death Date: 3 Oct 1943
Monument: North Africa
Last Known Status: Buried
U.S. Awards: Air Medal
Distinguished Flying Cross 
Phifer, Forest H. Jr. (I34821)
 
68 Social Security Death Index, 1935-Current
Name: James Harper
SSN: 226-14-8389
Last Residence: 23860 Hopewell, Hopewell City, Virginia
Born: 10 Nov 1901
Died: Jul 1975
State (Year) SSN issued: Virginia (Before 1951) 
Harper, James C. (I24138)
 
69 Social Security Death Index, 1935-Current
Name: John Carman Steele
Last Residence: 78213 San Antonio, Bexar, Texas
Born: 28 Nov 1921
Died: 27 Mar 2008
State (Year) SSN issued: New York (Before 1951) 
Steele, John Carman (I25292)
 
70 State of Florida. Florida Death Index, 1877-1998. Florida: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Records, 1998.

Name: Vernon W Burroughs
Gender: Male
Race: White
Death Date: Dec 1968
Death Place: Lee, Florida, United States

Social Security Death Index
Name: Vernon Burroughs
SSN: 226-12-5744
Last Residence: 33903 Fort Myers, Lee, Florida
BORN: 18 May 1920
Died: Dec 1968
State (Year) SSN issued: Virginia (Before 1951) 
Burroughs, Vernon (I33882)
 
71 Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002. Nashville, TN, USA: Tennessee State Library and Archives. Microfilm
Name: Nathan B Tate
Gender: Male
Marriage Date: 15 Nov 1899
Marriage Place: Hawkins, Tennessee
Spouse: Dora C Cope  
Family F3990
 
72 Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002. Nashville, TN: Tennessee State Library and Archives. Microfilm.
Name: Betty Teeters
Gender: Female
Marriage Date: 27 Sep 1954
Marriage Place: Loudon, Tennessee
Spouse: Cary Rose  
Family F14390
 
73 Texas Birth Index, 1903-1997. Texas: Texas Department of State Health Services. Microfiche.
Name: Cora Elizabeth Burt
Date of Birth: 4 Apr 1944
Gender: Female
Birth County: Hopkins
Father's name: Roy Burt
Mother's name: Loraine Price
Roll number: 1944_0002 
Burt, Cora Elizabeth (I32601)
 
74 Torry, Clarence A. New England Marriages Prior to 1700. Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2004.
Name: Joshua Towle
Gender: Male
Birth Year: 1663
Marriage Date: 2 Dec 1686
Marriage Place: New England
Death Year: 1715
Spouse: Sarah Towle  
Family F4863
 
75 Virginia, Births, 1864-2014. Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, Virginia
Name: Hal Leighton Tate
Birth Date: 20 Jul 1937
Birth Place: Russell, Virginia 
TATE, Hal Leighton (I14165)
 
76 Virginia, Births, 1864-2014. Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, Virginia.
Name: Giles Everett Ring
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 13 Mar 1907
Birth Place: Shenandoah, Virginia
Father: George Washington Ring
Mother: Lena Jackson Cassell 
Ring, Giles Everett Sr. (I32482)
 
77 Virginia, Births, 1864-2014. Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, Virginia.
Name: Junior Lee Alden Osborn
Birth Date: 22 May 1923
Birth Place: Tazewell Co. VA 
Osborne, Junior Lee Alden (I33930)
 
78 Virginia, Births, 1864-2014. Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, Virginia.
Name: Luther Honaker
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 12 Mar 1910
Birth Place: Buchanan, Virginia
Father: Ezra Wiser Honaker
Mother: Jennie Chambers 
HONAKER, Luther (I31470)
 
79 Virginia, Births, 1864?2014. Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, Virginia. Delayed Birth Certificate
Name: Charles Stuart Fugate
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 14 Oct 1910
Birth Place: Russell, Virginia
Father: Grover Cleveland Fugate
Mother: Mary Jane Meade 
Fugate, Charles Stuart (I33048)
 
80 Virginia, Births, 1864?2014. Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, Virginia. Delayed Birth Certificate
Name: Grady Allen Mcconnell
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 11 Jul 1908
Birth Place: Scott, Virginia
Father: Robert Lee Mcconnell
Mother: Sarah Effie Culbertson 
McConnell, Grady Allen (I33148)
 
81 Virginia, Deaths, 1912-2014. Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, Virginia

Name: Mrs Lucille Williamson
Gender: Female
Race: White
Age at Death: 23
Birth Date: 8 Mar 1907
Death Date: 1 Jun 1930
Death Place: Tazewell, Virginia, USA
Registration Date: 10 Jun 1930
Father: Hiram Whitaker
Mother: Belle Christian
Spouse: Harve C Williamson
Certificate Number: 1930018055 
WHITAKER, Anna Lucille (I42)
 
82 Virginia, Deaths, 1912-2014. Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, Virginia
Name: Elizabeth Matilda Harrison
Gender: Female
Race: White
Age at Death: 59
Birth Date: 11 Aug 1886
Death Date: 24 Jul 1946
Death Place: Bandy, Tazewell, Virginia
Cause of Death: Coronary occlusion, arteriosclerosis, hypertension
Registration Date: 20 Aug 1946
Father: Jack Beavers
Mother: Martha Sparks
Spouse: D C Harrison 
BEAVERS, Isabelle Matilda (Issie) (I3254)
 
83 Virginia, Deaths, 1912-2014. Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, Virginia.
Name: Mack Horton
Gender: Male
Race: White
Age at Death: 0
Birth Date: 7 Oct 1947
Death Date: 7 Oct 1947
Death Place: Richlands, Tazewell, Virginia
Registration Date: 17 Oct 1947
Father: Emory D Horton
Mother: Macy Stillwell 
HORTON, Mack (I31624)
 
84 Virginia, Deaths, 1912-2014. Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, Virginia.
Name: Martha Ellen Rawlings
Gender: Female
Race: White
Age at Death: 67
Birth Date: 16 Dec 1855
Death Date: 6 May 1923
Death Place: Rockbridge, Virginia
Registration Date: 9 Jun
Father: Wm P Templeton
Mother: Margaret T Clung
Spouse: J H Rawlings 
Templeton, Martha (I32395)
 
85 Virginia, Deaths, 1912-2014. Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, Virginia.
Name: Thomas Lee Nicely
Death Date: 30 Jun 1989
Death Place: Clifton Forge, VA

Social Security Death Index
Name: Thomas L. Nicely
SSN: 230-12-6289
BORN: 7 Nov 1923
Died: 30 Jun 1989
State (Year) SSN issued: Virginia (Before 1951) 
Nicely, Thomas Lee (I32051)
 
86 Virginia, Marriages, 1785-1940. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013.
Name: Achilles Herndon
Gender: Male
Marriage Date: 9 Mar 1818
Marriage Place: Campbell, Virginia
Spouse: Elizabeth Bradley
FHL Film Number: 31050 
Family F14794
 
87 Virginia, Marriages, 1936-2014. Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, Virginia.
Name: June Faye Delaney
Gender: Female
Race: White
Age: 21
Birth Date: abt 1922
Birthplace: Pikeville, KY
Marriage Date: 11 Oct 1943
Marriage Place: Norfolk, Virginia
Registration Place: Norfolk, Virginia
Father: John Wilbur Delaney
Mother: Ruth Tate [Rhoda]
Spouse: John Oliver Fry
Spouse Gender: Male
Spouse Race: White
Spouse Age: 22
Spouse Father: John Oliver Fry
Spouse Mother: Bertha Belle Baughman 
Family F13886
 
88 Virginia, Marriages, 1936-2014. Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, Virginia.
Name: Paul Burroughs
Gender: Male
Race: White
Age: 27
Birth Date: abt 1911
Marriage Date: 27 Aug 1938
Marriage Place: Tazewell, Virginia
Registration Place: Tazewell, Virginia
Father: George Burroughs
Mother: Daisy Arnold
Spouse: Margaret Bennett
Spouse Gender: Female
Spouse Race: White
Spouse Age: 22
Spouse Father: Henry Bennett
Spouse Mother: Sarah Catren 
Family F14115
 
89 Virginia, Select Marriages, 1785-1940
Name: Sam'L C. Hammond
Gender: Male
Marital Status: Single
Age: 35
Birth Date: 1833
Birth Place: Botetourt Co., VA.
Marriage Date: 13 Oct 1868
Marriage Place: Botetourt, Virginia
Father: Jno. Hammond
Mother: Cath.
Spouse: Hester J. Layman
Father: Jno. Layman
Mother: Hester A.
FHL Film Number: 30732
Reference ID: p 27, l 90 
Family F6232
 
90 Virginia, Select Marriages, 1785-1940
Name: Sarah M. Yow
Gender: Female
Marital Status: Single
Race: White
Age: 16
Birth Date: 1914
Birth Place: Greensboro, N.C.
Marriage Date: 18 Jan 1930
Marriage Place: Danville, Virginia
Father: R. C. Yow
Mother: Lora C. Williams
Spouse: C. Clyde Smith
FHL Film Number: 2048487
Reference ID: p3 rn76 
Family F12100
 
91 World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918
Name: William Rufus Christian
County: Buchanan
State: Virginia
Birth Date: 14 Mar 1876
Race: White 
CHRISTIAN, William Rufus (I25846)
 
92 World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942
Name: James Monroe Quillin Jr
Birth Date: 7 Apr 1880
Birth Place: Scott, Virginia
Residence: Wise, Virginia
Race: White 
QUILLIN, James Monroe (I33194)
 
93 "A Chronicle of the Kings of England by Sir Richard Baker, Knight." London, 1660.


Drue de Montagu married Aliva, daughter. of Alan Basset, baron of Wiccomb in County of Buckingham. After his death she married second, Richard, son of Gilbert Talbot, ancestor to the Earls of Shrewsbury.

His eldest son, also named Drue, died during his father's lifetime.

Drue de Monteacuto and his wife Aliva had an only daughter who became a nun at Shaftsbury, and a second son,- 
Bassett, Aliva (I36039)
 
94 "A Chronicle of the Kings of England by Sir Richard Baker, Knight." London, 1660.

But little is known with regard to this William Montacute except he was an only son, that he took care of the estate left him by his father, and died leaving it entire to an only son.
 
de Montagu, Wlliam I (I36042)
 
95 "A Chronicle of the Kings of England by Sir Richard Baker, Knight." London, 1660.

Drue de Montagu married Aliva, daughter. of Alan Basset, baron of Wiccomb in County of Buckingham. After his death she married second, Richard, son of Gilbert Talbot, ancestor to the Earls of Shrewsbury.
 
Bassett, Alan Baron of Wiccomb (I36040)
 
96 "A Chronicle of the Kings of England by Sir Richard Baker, Knight." London, 1660.

He recovered all of the lands which his father had lost. But in the '7th of Henry III. (1233) he also had his lands, distrained by Virtue of the King's precept for omitting to repair to Court at the feast of Whitsuntide, there to receive the dignity of Knighthood, as was required by law. But the next year on doing his homage be was by the Sheriff of Somerset and Dorset reinstated in his possessions,. He died 31st of Henry III. (1247) leaving issue William his son and heir. 
de Montagu, William III (I36035)
 
97 "A Chronicle of the Kings of England by Sir Richard Baker, Knight." London, 1660.

He succeeded to the barony, and in the sixth year of Richard I. (1196) paid 6-1s-6d for his estates in the County of Somerset as scutage for the King's ransom.

He was sheriff of Dorsetshire and Somersetshire in the sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth years of King John (1205-1209); which fully proves his importance at that time, when none but persons of the greatest rank and property were admitted to that office. For the first of these years he had under him Osbert, the clerk, his deputy.

Being one of the great barons of that reign who stood up for the liberties of their country, and being found (7th John) in arms with the rebellious barons against the King, he was stripped of all his lands in Counties of Somerset and Dorset, which were seized by the King and given to Ralph de Ralegh. He died 18th of King John (1218). He married Isabel, daughter. of ____ and left an only son and heir who succeeded to the estate.
 
de Montagu, William II (I36036)
 
98 "A Chronicle of the Kings of England by Sir Richard Baker, Knight." London, 1660.

He was born about the year 1040. He became the trusted companion, follower, and intimate friend of Robert, Earl of Moriton (or Mortain), the favorite brother of William, Duke of Normandy.

Drogo and the Earl of Moriton were of the same age and both entered heartily into the plans of William in his proposed expedition against England.

This expedition was in active preparation in the summer of 1066 and was composed of sixty thousand men and over three hundred ships. Drogo de Monte-acuto accompanied the expedition in the immediate retinue of Robert, Earl of Mortain.
----------------

Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_de_Montagu,_1st_Baron_Montagu

The family originated in Normandy, at the manor of Montaigu-les-Bois, in the arrondissement of Coutances, which remained in the possession of the family until the death of Sebastien de Montaigu in 1715, without progeny.[3] Two persons named Montagu or similar appear in the Domesday Book of 1086: Ansger and Drogo de Montaigu, both richly endowed with lands, but Ansger died leaving no heir.[4] Drogo's lands were in Somerset, where two of the manors he held in 1086, namely Sutton Montagu and Shipton Montagu, his seat, still retain his name.[5] According to the Duchess of Cleveland (1889): "He had come to England in the train of the Earl of Mortain, and received from him large grants of lands, with the custody of the castle, built either by the Earl or his son William, in the manor of Bishopston, and styled, from its position on a sharp-topped hill, Monte Acuto"

They landed at Pevensey upon the coast of Sussex, late in September, 1066, and immediately burned and scuttled their ships, that their only hope might lie in their courage and resolution, their only safety in victory.

This marked the advent of the first Montague upon the shores of England, and as he marches on toward the plain near Hastings (where, upon the 14th of October, the battle of Hastings was fought and won).

William having conquered England and ascended the throne his followers were rewarded with large grants of land. Both his favorite brother the Earl of Moriton and his trusty follower Drogo de Monte-acuto received large possessions.

Drogo obtained the grant of several Manors, particularly in the county of Somerset. The original castle or seat of Drogo was at Montacute, an eminence and parish in Tintinhull Hundred, Somersetshire, four miles south from Ilchester. Its ancient name appears to have been Logoresburg and was also called Bishopston. Here the Earl of Mortain built a castle and named it after his friend Drogo de Monte-acuto.

While this was the original home of the Montagues, the seat of their barony was at Shepton Montacute a villa at no great distance from Montacute. This parish contains the hamlets of upper and lower Shepton, Knolle, and Stoney Stoke, and was held by Drogo de Monte-acuto and his direct descendants until the time of King Henry VIII. when Sir Thomas Montacute leaving no male issue, this estate was divided between three sisters. We find the said Drogo-de-Monte-acuto in possession of these estates until his death, which took place about the latter end of the reign of King Henry I. (about 1125) 
de Monte-Acuto, Drogo (I36043)
 
99 "A Chronicle of the Kings of England by Sir Richard Baker, Knight." London, 1660.

It is recorded of him, that in the second year of Henry II. (1156) he paid 20 into the King's exchequer for the ancient pleas; and 7th of Henry II. (1161) upon the collection of the scutage then levied, he paid 20 marks for the Knight's fees (a yard land Of 40 acres paid two shillings and sixpence tax) which he at that time held, soon after which he died, leaving issue his son Drue, who was called "Drogo Juvenis" ? or Young Drue.
 
de Montagu, Richard (I36041)
 
100 "A Chronicle of the Kings of England by Sir Richard Baker, Knight." London, 1660.

Upon the assessment of the aid for marrying the King's daughter, 12th Henry II. (1167) certified his Knight's fees to be in number-nine, a half and a third part of the old feosment and one of the new (640 acres made a Knight's fee).

He married Aliva, daughter. of Alan Basset, baron of Wiccomb in County of Buckingham. After his death she married second, Richard, son of Gilbert Talbot, ancestor to the Earls of Shrewsbury.

His eldest son, also named Drue, died during his father's lifetime. 
de Montagu, Drue (I36038)
 

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