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101 "A Chronicle of the Kings of England by Sir Richard Baker, Knight." London, 1660.

William had summons to attend the King into Gascony, against Alphonse 10th, King of Castile, who had usurped the province. The 4'st of Henry III, he was summoned to be with the King at Chester on the feast day of St. Peter, well furnished with horse and arms, thence to march against Llewellin ap Griffith prince of Wales. 42d of Henry III. He had a similar citation. By Berta his wife he left issue his son and heir, Simon. 
de Montagu, William IV (I36033)
 
102 "Alabama Deaths and Burials, 1881-1952." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009, 2010.

Name: Lucy Duke Larrimore
Birth Date: 23 Jan 1865
Birth Place: Mettieboro, Alabama [Nettleboro]
Death Date: 12 Mar 1948
Death Place: Thomasville, Clarke, Alabama
Burial Date: 14 Mar 1948
Cemetery Name: Salem
Death Age: 83
Occupation: Housewife
Race: White
Marital Status: Widowed
Gender: Female
Residence: Thomasville, Clarke, Alabama
Spouse Name: N G Larrimore
FHL Film Number: 1908827

 
DUKE, Lucy (I23269)
 
103 "Alleghaney Co (VA) Heritage", Hildreth Smith article, page 192.
Louisa Harman married Thomas B. Christian 
HARMAN, Louisa (I4415)
 
104 "Annals of Tazewell Co, VA", Harman, Vol I, page 85.
Squire Wingo married Mary Shipler on 9 Apr 1826 in Tazewell Co, VA.

1850 Census, Tazewell Co, VA, Western District, taken on 30 Sep 1850, Page 309B, Family # 1291.
Listed as Esquire Wingo, age 46, born in VA, carpenter, head of household.

1860 Census, Tazewell Co, VA, Cedar Bluff PO, taken on 9 Aug 1860, Page 873, Family #1292.
Listed as Squire Wingo, age 57, born in VA, carpenter, head of household.

1870 Census, Tazewell Co, VA, Maiden Spring Township, Knob PO, taken on 29 Aug 1870, Page 296B, Family #508.
Listed as William Wingo, age 65, born in VA, farmer, head of household. 
WINGO, William Esquire (I8184)
 
105 "Annals of Tazewell Co, VA", Harman, Vol I, page 85.
Squire Wingo married Mary Shipler on 9 Apr 1826 in Tazewell Co, VA.

1850 Census, Tazewell Co, VA, Western District, taken on 30 Sep 1850, Page 309B, Family # 1291.
Listed as Mary Wingo, age 39, born in VA (sic, KY), in household of husband, William Esquire Wingo.

1860 Census, Tazewell Co, VA, Cedar Bluff PO, taken on 9 Aug 1860, Page 873, Family #1292.
Listed as Mary Wingo, age 47, born in KY, in household of husband, William E. Wingo.

1870 Census, Tazewell Co, VA, Maiden Spring Township, Knob PO, taken on 23 Aug 1870, Page 292B, Family #449.
Listed as Mary L. Wingo, age 58, born in VA, in household of son, Henderson R. Wingo.

1870 Census, Tazewell Co, VA, Maiden Spring Township, Knob PO, taken on 29 Aug 1870, Page 296B, Family #508.
Listed as Pollie Wingo, age 60, born in VA, in household of husband, William Wingo.
(Mary is listed twice in this census) 
SHIPLEY, Mary (I8185)
 
106 "Annals of Tazewell Co, VA", Harman, Vol I, page 85.
Thomas Christian married on 18 Jun 1829 Mary Altizer in Tazewell Co, VA.

Virginia Marriages, 1740-1850
Groom Name: Thomas Christian
Bride Name: Mary Alizer
Marriage Date: 18 Jun 1829
County: Tazewell
State: Virginia
Dodd, Jordan R., et al.. Early American Marriages: Virginia to 1850. Bountiful, UT 
ALTIZER, Mary [Polly] C. (I4416)
 
107 "Annals of Tazewell Co, VA", Harman, Vol II, page 445.
The Harman Family. Daughter of Daniel, Sr and Anna Bughsen Harman. She married _______Wright. 
HARMAN, Rebecca (I8684)
 
108 "Annals of Tazewell Co, VA", Harman, Vol II, page 445.
The Harman Family. He married his first cousin, Christina Harman, daughter of Daniel (son of Heinrich Adam Harman.

"Harman Genealogy, Southern Branch", John Newton Harman, Sr, page 69.

"Harman Genealogy, Southern Branch", 1700-1924, Harman, page 28. Henry A. Harman married Christina Harman on 26 Aug 1847. 
HARMAN, Henry Adam (I8662)
 
109 "Annals of Tazewell Co, VA", Harman, Vol II, page 445.
The Harman Family. Hezekiah Harman married Polly Brown on 6 April 1802.

"Archives of Tazewell...", Yantis, page 247.
Hezekiah Harman, born 30 Oct 1771, married Mary Brown, daughter of Low Brown.

1850 Census, Tazewell Co, VA, Western District, taken on 4 Aug 1850, Page 249A, Family #461. Listed as Mary Harman; age 66, born in VA; in household of son, Elias G. W. Harman. 
Brown, Mary (Polly) (I8654)
 
110 "Annals of Tazewell Co, VA", Harman, Vol II, page 445.
The Harman Family. Son of Daniel, Sr and Anna Bughsen Harman.
He married and moved from Clinch River area to Pikeville, Ky abt 1805. Had five sons: Adam, William, Quiller, Dow, and Mathias. 
HARMAN, Daniel Jr, (I8681)
 
111 "Annals of Tazewell Co, VA", Harman, Vol II, page 445.
The Harman Family. Son of Heinrich Adam Harman, Sr. Born in Straburg, VA.

Connelley, William Elsey. The founding of Harman's Station: with an account of the Indian captivity of Mrs. Jennie Wiley and the exploration and settlement of the Big Sandy Valley in the Virginias and Kentucky, to which is affixed a brief account of the Connelly family and some of its collateral and related families in America. (New York, New York: Torch Press, c1910).

"Matthias Harman was called "Tice" or "Tias" Harman by his companions. He was diminutive in size, in height being but little more than five feet, and his weight never exceeded one hundred and twenty pounds. He had an enormous nose and a thin sharp face. He had an abundance of hair of a yellow tinge, beard of a darker hue, blue eyes which anger made green and glittering, and a bearing bold and fearless. He possessed an iron constitution, and could endure more fatigue and privation than any of his associates. He was a dead shot with the long rifle of his day. The Indians believed him in league with the devil or some other malevolent power because of their numbers he killed, his miraculous escapes, and the bitterness and relentless daring of his warfare against them. He was one of the Long Hunters, as were others of the Harmans, and more than once did his journeys into the wilderness carry him to the Mississippi River. He and the other Harmans able to bear arms were in the Virginia service in the War of the Revolution. He is said to have formed the colony which made the first settlement in Ab's Valley. He formed the colony which made the first settlement in Eastern Kentucky and erected the blockhouse. He brought in the settlers who rebuilt the blockhouse, and for a number of years he lived in the Blockhouse bottom or its vicinity. In his extreme old age he returned to Virginia and died there. It is said he lived to be ninety-six, but I have not the date or place of his death."

-----------------

Historical marker #736 (Kentucky)
Harman's Station is Kentucky historical marker #736 located 5 mi. S. of Paintsville, US 23, 460.

Description: The first settlement in Eastern Kentucky. Matthias Harman's party of hunters from Virginia built stockade near river bank, 1787. Indians forced evacuation in 1788, and burned blockhouse. Harman and others returned, 1789, and rebuilt an enduring fort. These men at Blockhouse Bottom broke Indian hold on Big Sandy Valley, opened Eastern Kentucky for settlement.

-----------------

Historical marker X-25 (Dry Fork, Virginia)
Sign reads: Harman helped establish the first permanent English settlement in eastern Kentucky in 1755. In 1789 he founded Harman?s Station on the Levisa River near John?s Creek in present-day Johnson County. He and his wife, Lydia, settled in this area in 1803.

-----------------

Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
English, West Virginia Mathias Harman and his wife Lydia were the first English settlers in the present county. They lived in a cabin along the Dry Fork River as early as 1802.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English,_West_Virginia

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Served in the American Revolution as a Captain in James Maxwell's Company.
http://services.dar.org/public/dar_research/search_descendants/?action=list&MyPrimary_Seqn=866595&MyLineageCount=1&Control_Min_Seqn=866595

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"Heritage of McDowell Co, WV...", John Estel Harman article, page 163. Henry Mitchell Harman, son of Mathias and Lydia Skaggs Harman, married Susan Christian. Mathias Harman lived and died 2 April 1832 on Dry Fork, Tazewell Co, VA.

"Alleghaney Co (VA) Heritage", Hildreth Smith article, page 192.

-----------------

Source: "Reed and Related Families of Tazewell County, Virginia and McDowell County, West Virginia", by Juanita S Halstead.

Mathias Harman, Sr was a son of Heinrich Adam Harman and Louisa Katrina. Mathias was well known in Southwest VA as an Indian fighter, a "Long Hunter", and a conqueror of the wilderness. He and others were the founders of Harman's Station in KY near what is now Paintsville, KY. It was back to this fort that Jenny Wiley made her way when she escaped from the Indians. Jenny was escorted back to her home in Virginia, but she and her husband returned to KY and made their permanent home near to where "Jenny Wiley Park" is now located. Mathias and Lydia (nee Skaggs) Harman returned to Tazewell County where they lived out their lives. The site of Mathias' home is on Dry Fork and I have been told that there is an old family cemetery on this land.

-------------

From the unpublished manuscript, Indian Atrocities Along the Clinch, Powell and Holston Rivers, by Emory L. Hamilton pages 164-172.

This family of Harmans were of German origin, Adam Heinrich Hermann emigrating to America in 1726, with a brief stop over the Isle of Man, where Henry Harman of this sketch was
born. Seven Harman brothers emigrated from Germany together, Jacob, Valentine, Mathias, George, Daniel, John, and Heinrich Adam. They first stopped off in Pennsylvania, then emigrated to the Shenandoah Valley and some on into North Carolina. At least three of these brothers settled in
Southwest Virginia, namely, Heinrich Adam, Valentin and Jacob. They were living in the New River German settlement, the first settlement ever made west of the Alleghenies on the "Western Waters", and were living there prior to 1745. In 1749 Moravian Missionaries conducted the first recorded religious services in Southwest Virginia in the home of Jacob Harman, and Dr. Thomas Walker mentions stopping at the home of Harman on his memorable exploration trip in 1750.

Valentine and Jacob were both killed by Indians on New River. Valentine was killed on Sinking Creek in what is now Giles Co., VA. In a land suit filed in the High Court of
Chancery in Augusta Co., on the 23rd of July, 1807, Taylor vs Harman, Mathias Harman, nephew of the slain Valentine, says: Valentine was killed by the Indians on New River and at the same time his (Mathias') brother, Daniel Harman and Andrew Moser were taken prisoner. Daniel made his escape, but Andrew was held prisoner.

On the 30th of June, 1808, Daniel Harman, deposes, in the same land suit, saying: In 1757, Valentine was killed in my presence less than a foot away from me, and I was taken prisoner. Valentine Harman, who was slain left a widow
Mary Harman, but no children.

The Harmans of this sketch are the descendants of Heinrich Adam Hermann who emigrated from Germany, who married Louisa
Katrina, October 8, 1723. Louisa Katrina died March 18, 1749. The children of this marriage were:

[1] Adam Harman, the eldest, born in Germany in 1724;

[2] Henry Harman born on the Isle of Man in 1726;

[3] George Harman, 1727 - 1749;

[4] Daniel Harman, born Pennsylvania, 1729;

[5] Mathias Harman, born near Strausburg, VA, in 1736;

[6] Christina Harman, who married Jeremiah Pate, and lived on Little River in Montgomery Co., VA;

[7] Catherine Harman who married Ulrich Richards in Rowan Co., NC;

[8] Phillipina Harman, who died in 1751;

[9] Valentine Harman who settled on the upper Clinch River in 1771, and moved to Lincoln Co., KY, about 1775, and was a member of the Henderson Legislature at Boonesboro in May, 1775;

[10] A daughter, name unknown, married a Mr. Looney;

[11] Jacob Harman, perhaps the Jacob who settled in Tazewell
Co., VA in 1771.

The sons of old Heinrich Adam Hermann, the German emigrant, became great hunters and Indian fighters. While most of them were great hunters, one in particular became one of the noted Long Hunters. It is hard to determine just which
son this was, but evidence points to the youngest who was Jacob.

Sources:

Calender Virginia State Papers, Vol. IV, page 564.
Harman Genealogy by John Newton Harman
Augusta Court Causes Ended, Taylor vs Harman.
Augusta Court Causes Ended, Wynn vs Inglish heirs.
 
HARMAN, Mathias (Tice or Tias) Sr. (I3841)
 
112 "Annals of Tazewell Co, VA", Harman, Vol II, page 445.
The Harman Family. Son of Heinrich Adam Harman, Sr. Born on his parents way to America. Married Nancy Ann Wilburn in Rowan Co, NC abt 1759. 
WILBURN, Anna Nancy (I4545)
 
113 "Annals of Tazewell Co, VA", Harman, Vol II, page 445.
The Harman Family. Son of Heinrich Adam Harman, Sr. He also had a son, Adam, and other children who had their home in NC.

From the unpublished manuscript, Indian Atrocities Along the Clinch, Powell and Holston Rivers, by Emory L. Hamilton pages 164-172.

This family of Harmans were of German origin, Adam Heinrich Hermann emigrating to America in 1726, with a brief stop over the Isle of Man, where Henry Harman of this sketch was
born. Seven Harman brothers emigrated from Germany together, Jacob, Valentine, Mathias, George, Daniel, John, and Heinrich Adam. They first stopped off in Pennsylvania, then emigrated to the Shenandoah Valley and some on into North Carolina. At least three of these brothers settled in
Southwest Virginia, namely, Heinrich Adam, Valentin and Jacob. They were living in the New River German settlement, the first settlement ever made west of the Alleghenies on the "Western Waters", and were living there prior to 1745. In 1749 Moravian Missionaries conducted the first recorded religious services in Southwest Virginia in the home of Jacob Harman, and Dr. Thomas Walker mentions stopping at the home of Harman on his memorable exploration trip in 1750.

Valentine and Jacob were both killed by Indians on New River. Valentine was killed on Sinking Creek in what is now Giles Co., VA. In a land suit filed in the High Court of
Chancery in Augusta Co., on the 23rd of July, 1807, Taylor vs Harman, Mathias Harman, nephew of the slain Valentine, says: Valentine was killed by the Indians on New River and at the same time his (Mathias') brother, Daniel Harman and Andrew Moser were taken prisoner. Daniel made his escape, but Andrew was held prisoner.

On the 30th of June, 1808, Daniel Harman, deposes, in the same land suit, saying: In 1757, Valentine was killed in my presence less than a foot away from me, and I was taken prisoner. Valentine Harman, who was slain left a widow
Mary Harman, but no children.

The Harmans of this sketch are the descendants of Heinrich Adam Hermann who emigrated from Germany, who married Louisa
Katrina, October 8, 1723. Louisa Katrina died March 18, 1749. The children of this marriage were:

[1] Adam Harman, the eldest, born in Germany in 1724;

[2] Henry Harman born on the Isle of Man in 1726;

[3] George Harman, 1727 - 1749;

[4] Daniel Harman, born Pennsylvania, 1729;

[5] Mathias Harman, born near Strausburg, VA, in 1736;

[6] Christina Harman, who married Jeremiah Pate, and lived on Little River in Montgomery Co., VA;

[7] Catherine Harman who married Ulrich Richards in Rowan Co., NC;

[8] Phillipina Harman, who died in 1751;

[9] Valentine Harman who settled on the upper Clinch River in 1771, and moved to Lincoln Co., KY, about 1775, and was a member of the Henderson Legislature at Boonesboro in May, 1775;

[10] A daughter, name unknown, married a Mr. Looney;

[11] Jacob Harman, perhaps the Jacob who settled in Tazewell
Co., VA in 1771.

The sons of old Heinrich Adam Hermann, the German emigrant, became great hunters and Indian fighters. While most of them were great hunters, one in particular became one of the noted Long Hunters. It is hard to determine just which
son this was, but evidence points to the youngest who was Jacob.

Sources:

Calender Virginia State Papers, Vol. IV, page 564.
Harman Genealogy by John Newton Harman
Augusta Court Causes Ended, Taylor vs Harman.
Augusta Court Causes Ended, Wynn vs Inglish heirs. 
HARMAN, Heinrich Adam Jr. (I4496)
 
114 "Annals of Tazewell Co, VA", Harman, Vol II, page 448.
Nancy Harman married Kiah Harman, son of Hezekiah, Sr. of Henry Sr. She died in 1866. Their children were: Henry Dorsey, Rhoda, Christina, Hezekiah Augustus, and Erastus French Harman.

McDowell Co, Births: 1887-1899, Marriages: 1861-1899, Wills & Inventories: 1860-1899, WV Archives & History Library, 929.3 H62, 111.

Kiah Harman will probated 27 Nov 1867, resided in Tazewell Co, VA; wife Nancy B.; children, Henry D., Rhoda May, Christina Austin, Hezekiah; grandchildren, children of E.
F. Harman, Rhoda May and H.A. Harman.

1850 Census, Tazewell Co, VA, taken on 3 Aug 1850, Page 248B, Family #459. Listed as Ciar Harman, age 50, born in VA, farmer, head of household.

1860 Census, Tazewell Co, VA, Five Oaks PO, taken on 7 Jul 1860, Page 785, Family #663. Listed as Kiah Harman, age 60, born in VA, farmer, head of household. 
Harman, Hezekiah (Kiah) Jr. (I8648)
 
115 "Clinch Valley News"
Tazewell, Tazewell Co., VA
Friday, October 22, 1948

DEATH

WILLIAM ALTIZER

WILLIAM RILEY ALTIZER, 88 years of age, a retired farmer and coal miner, died last Thursday at his the home of his son, G. H. ALTIZER, at North Tazewell.

He was the son of the late THOMAS and SALLY BEAVERS ATIZER, of Tazewell county. His wife and five children preceded him in death.

He is survived by the following sons and daughters: G. H. of North Tazewell; TOM and L. J. , of Bishop,; S. W. , of Keene Mountain; CHARLES, of Denver, Col.; MRS. E. G. MC CANN, of Baptist Valley, and MRS. C. H. OSBORNE, of
Bluefield, Va. There also survives one sister, MRS SUSIE CROUSE , of Bandy; four half sisters; three half brothers and sixty grandchildren and fifty-five great grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon from the Advent Church in Adria.

[G. H. Altizer-George Homer Altizer, married Hattie Blanch Shrader, d/o Harvey King Shrader & Lydia Belle Beavers.

L. J. Altizer-Lundsfor/Lunsfred Altizer.

S. W. - Samuel W. Altizer].



Grave site lcoated on findagrave.com
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GScid=2200731&GRid=17120030& 
ALTIZER, William Riley (I4322)
 
116 "Compiled Tazewell Co Birth Index" "A B C D", Tazewell Co, VA Web Site Rees Chambers, son of Thomas and Nancy (______) Chambers, was born abt 1833 in Tazewell Co, VA. CHAMBERS, Rees(e) (I3913)
 
117 "Early Vital Records of Waterborough, Maine," New England Genealogical Historical Register, July 1936, p. 249.  Family F7426
 
118 "He was named, it seems, for Richard Lord of Hartford, CT, the first of that name in New England, who at the age of twenty-one years sailed from the port of London, Eng., in 1632. He was made a freeman at Cambridge, MA, March 4, 1635. He settled in Hartford, CT in 1636.

He was commander of the first company of troopers in the Indian conflicts in that part of New England. He died at New London, CT, interred in the old burying ground. He was a brother of Robert Lord, mariner, of Boston, MA, who owned large tracts of land in York County, ME.

He was a "Representative to ye great and General Court at Boston, 1657-1661." He died May 17, 1762, aged 51 years." 
LORD, Capt. Richard (I7011)
 
119 "Heritage of Wyoming Co, WV", 1995 WGS, John Chambers article, page 94 submitted by Christopher C. Chambers.

CENSUS RECORDS

1860 Census
Name: John Chambers
Age: 1
Birth Year: abt 1859
Gender: Male
Birth Place: Virginia
Home in 1860: Western District, Tazewell, Virginia
Post Office: Cedar Bluff
Family Number: 1018
Household Members:
Name Age
Rees Chambers 35
Emily Chambers 40
Rhoda Chambers 12
Thomas Chambers 4
Napoleon Chambers 3
John Chambers 1

1870 Census
Name: John Chambers
Age in 1870: 8
Birth Year: abt 1862
Birthplace: Virginia
Home in 1870: Maiden Spring, Tazewell, Virginia
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Knob
Household Members:
Name Age
Reese Chambers 38
Emazilla Chambers 40
Thomas Chambers 12
Henderson Chambers 10
John Chambers 8
Louisa Chambers 2
Sarah Chambers 6
Mary Chambers 8

1900 Census, Wyoming Co, WV, Baileysville District, taken on 4 Jun 1900, Page 205B, Family #28. Listed as John Chambers, age 41, born in Apr 1859 in VA, married for 3 years, farmer, head of household.

1910 Census, Wyoming Co, WV; Baileysvelle District, taken on 25 Apr 1910; Page 190B, Family #140. Listed as John Chambers, age 51, born in VA, married twice, last time for 22
years, farmer, head of household. 
CHAMBERS, John (I4081)
 
120 "Hodges Council made his will in Isle of Wight 1699. He married Lucy daughter of John Hardy, Justice of the County Court, about 1675..Hodges Council, in his will of 1699, mentions daughter Christian wife of Edward Bryan." [Boddie, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight, page 216] COUNCIL, Hodges (I7287)
 
121 "In The Name of God Amen. I Margret Warren of the town of Kittrey.... doe make this my Last will and testament in manner as followeth...

2ly I give and bequeath unto my Son Gilbird Warren one Cow and three Sheep.

3ly I give and bequeath to my daughter margret Stackpole my great Brass Kittle and two Blankits and one Coverlid and ten yeards of woling Cloath and my great wodden platter and one pare of Sheets and all my waring Cloathes

4ly I give and bequeath into my Son James Warren my feather bed and bolster and all the Rest of my Estat whatsoever abroad or at home without dores or within

5ly I doe ordain and Appoint my Son James Warren the hole and Soul Executor to this my Last will and testament revoaking and Renounsing all other will heretofore by me made

In witness hereof I set to my hand and Seal this thirteen day of december Anno Domni-one thousand seven hundred and twelve-

Signed Sealed and ( ) to be her Last will and testament

in the presence of
her
Margret X Warren
mark
his
Baker X Nason
mark
Joseph Wood
Thomas Curtis"(13) 
Margaret (I7077)
 
122 "John, sold property inherited from his father, Joseph Hurst to Thomas Harvey and bought what is now known as 'Locksley Hall' from Ann Gordon and Chas Rogers on Herring Creek & Cupids Creek."

Will: 15 OCT 1811 Northumberland Co., VA

son, John Nutt Hurst, dau. Elizabeth H.Hurst, dau. Susanna Hurst, Joseph & Noah Richardson?? Three children, John N., Elizabeth H. and Susanna Hurst. 
HURST, John (I7136)
 
123 "Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979"; LDS Web Site.
Nathaniel R. Christian; age 23; married Comfort Daniels; age 20 on 25 Jul 1857 in Pike Co, KY. 
Family F9080
 
124 "Marriage Bonds of Franklin Co. VA, 1786-1858, p. 50,
Bryant, Daniel & Lucy Key, Nov. 17, 1829 surety by John Spencer.  
Family F13772
 
125 "Marriage Records of McDowell Co, WV", page 11.
Marriage Record, Book 1, 1865-1896, page 106.
James Nelson, age 22, born in Ashe Co, NC, son of Sarah Nelson married on 6 May 1877 Mary Brown, age 16, born in (______) Co, VA. daughter of Henry and Pheobe Brown. 
Family F686
 
126 "Marriage Records of McDowell Co, WV", page 22.
Marriage Record, Book 1, 1865-1896, page 113.

Flemmar Pack, age 41, widowed, born in Floyd Co, KY, married on 15 Jul 1884 Rebecca R. Holebrook, age 17, born in McDowell Co, WV, daughter of I.W. and Causba [Cosby] Holbrook. His parents are unnamed. The information on the second page, is bumped up one line from the way the book is opened.

Fleming was born in Patrick Co. VA, but Rebecca's will indicates this is the correct Fleming Pack.

http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11390335&Type=Marriage 
Family F1973
 
127 "Marriage Records of McDowell Co, WV", page 30. Marriage Record, Book 1, 1865-1896, page 118. James Nelson, age 37, born in Ashe Co, NC, son of Harvey and Sarah Nelson, married on 12 Sep 1888 to Margaret Brown, age 24, born in Tazewell Co, VA, daughter of Henry and Pheobe Brown.

1860 Census for Ashe Co. NC, household 369, he is listed as James age 5 with father Harvey Nelson, age 30, farmer, personal property woth $185 born in VA, mother, Sarah, age 27, and siblings Jane age 7, Mary age 3, and Susan age 1.

1870 census for McDowell Co. WV, he is listed as James D. Nelson, age 14 in household 53 with his stepfather, Marion Dancy.

1880 census for McDowell Co. WV, he is living next to his mother and stepfather in household 126, age 24, married, a famer, living with his wife Margaret, age 16 and daughter Sarah E., age 1. 
NELSON, James L. (I222)
 
128 "Maryland Births and Christenings, 1600-1995." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009, 2010.
Name: Archibald James Hunter
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 28 Dec 1910
Christening Comments: Episcopal Diocese of Maryland; Prince of Peace Church
Father's name: Archibald J Hunter
Mother's name: Elizabeth Lawton
FHL Film Number: 2070862 
Hunter, Archibald James Jr. (I32838)
 
129 "Massachusetts Deaths, 1841-1915," database with images, FamilySearch

Name Ruth M. Alsen
Event Type Death
Cause of Death: Whooping cough
Event Date 04 May 1903
Event Place Arlington, Massachusetts
Gender Female
Age 3
Marital Status Single
Birthplace Arlington
Birth Year (Estimated) 1900
Burial Date 06 May 1903
Cemetery Mt. Pleasant
Father's Name Carl W. Alsen
Father's Birthplace Sweeden
Mother's Name Anna W. Anderson
Mother's Birthplace Sweeden 
Alsen, Ruth (I36373)
 
130 "McDowell County, WV Heritage...", Landon Collins article, page 123. Ferrell Hatfield Kennedy, son of Daniel and Pheobe Evans Kennedy, married Lady Payne. Daniel was son of Ali and Christina Whitt Kennedy. Lady Payne was a daughter of Adam and Mary Louise Christian Payne. PAYNE, Lady (I3754)
 
131 "McDowell County, WV Heritage...", Louis and Cleo Kennedy Collins article,page 124.
Cleo Kennedy was born on Oozley Branch, near Bradshaw, WV. She married Louis Hassel Collins on 3 Jul 1936. They had three children: Joetta Collins (married ______Hooker), Landon (married Waima Coleman, daughter of J.R. and
Lucille Coleman), and Norma (married ______Harrison). 
Kennedy, Chloe (I19157)
 
132 "New Hampshire Marriage Records 1637-1947." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2011. New Hampshire Bureau of Vital Records. ?Marriage Records.? New Hampshire Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics, Concord.

Name: Joseph Russell
Marriage Date: 15 May 1746
Event Type: Marriage
Marriage Place: Hampton Falls, Rockingham, New Hampshire
Gender: Male
Spouse Name: Abigail Tolle
Spouse Gender: Female
FHL Film Number: 1001299 
Family F4511
 
133 "Reed and Related Families of Tazewell County, Virginia and McDowell County, West Virginia", by Juanita S Halstead.

Amanuel Reed, son of J. W. Reed, Sr and Nancy (nee Christian) Reed, married Robina Beavers on 17 April 1876 in Tazewell County, VA. Robina was a daughter of Alexander Beavers and his second wife, Rachel Barnett. 
BEAVERS, Robina (I3129)
 
134 "The Alexander Family of Scotland, Ireland and America", compiled by Frances Austin Arnold of Carrollton, Missouri, 1896

Thomas married and left a daughter and a son. The daughter married Joseph Parks and had a daughter named Margaret. The son, William, was "a very fat man". He left four sons:

Archibald, William, who married a widow in Philadelphia, Robert and Peter.  
ALEXANDER, William Sr. (I5788)
 
135 "The Alexander Family of Scotland, Ireland and America", compiled by Frances Austin Arnold of Carrollton, Missouri, 1896

Thomas married and left a daughter and a son. The daughter married Joseph Parks and had a daughter named Margaret. The son, William, was "a very fat man". He left four sons:

Archibald, William, who married a widow in Philadelphia, Robert and Peter. 
Martha (I10145)
 
136 "The life of Daniel Boone", written by Lyman C Draper, LL.D.

"Henry, Charles, and Richard SKAGGS and three other brothers were grandsons of an Irishman who fled from Ireland of Londonderry in 1688-'89, when so many of the hardy Scotch-Irish race emigrated to the shores of the New World. We find his adventurous descendants, natives of Maryland, living on the frontiers of New River and sharing largely in the toils and hardships of the Long Hunters in 1770-'71.

In June 1775 we find Henry SKAGGS aiding to pilot Col. Thomas SLAUGHTER and others on an exploratory tour of the Green River country. Henry SKAGGS and brothers were a noted family of hunters and nothing but hunters; and keeping pace with the advancing settlements, they pushed forward to Clinch River and were forting in 1777 at Shadrach WHITE's Station in the neighborhood of the Maiden Spring Fork of the Clinch.

In 1781 one of the family of SKAGGS who had been residing in the Cumberland settlements removed to Kentucky. In 1779 Henry SKAGGS, accompanied by upwards of twenty men, started for Kentucky, were attacked by Indians in POWELL's Valley, lost part of their horses, when all had returned, save SKAGGS, his son John, a mere youth, and a man named SINCLAIR. With eleven horses, they went to the Green River country to hunt, and during the succeeding hard winter, SINCLAIR got lost, probably drowned in the Green River, and young SKAGGS sickened and died, and amidst the severities of the season, a hollow log was his burial place. His father was left alone to finish the hunt and return home with the horses, pelts, and furs.

He settled on Pitman's Creek in the Green River country within present Taylor County, Kentucky, in 1789, with his children and connections around him sharing freely in the Indian difficulties of the times; and there he died in 1808 or '9, aged upwards of eighty years.

Possessing a large and bony frame, he was bold, enterprising, and fearless. His brothers, Charles and Richard, who also settled in that region, lived to a good old age." [note 23, p.277: "MS. statements of Capt. John BARBEE, derived from Thomas and Moses SKAGGS, son of Charles SKAGGS; MS. notes of conversations with Morgan VARDEMAN of Kentucky."] Lyman C. Draper, The Life of Daniel Boone, Ted Franklin Belue, ed. (Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 1998), 268-69.

"Two other long hunters known to REDD were William PITTMAN and Henry SKAGS, of whom [note 15] he said, "they were men of high sense of honor and vary great truth." Both probably lived for awhile in this section for PITMAN's Creek is a branch of Blackwater River, and several members of the SKAGS family, John, Charles and Zachariah, were given in the first list of tithables for Pittsylvania County.

"It is very probable that WALDEN and his friends had served in the recent Indian campaign and ranging along the frontiers had seen for themselves the great abundance of game that lived undisturbed in the virgin forest of Southwest Virginia. They remained on this hunt eighteen months, ranging over southwestern Virginia and eastern Tennessee and Kentucky, naming the mountains and streams as they came to them. POWELL's Mountain . . . [as well as] the adjacent river and valley. WALDEN's Ridge was named for WALDEN; SCAG's Ridge and NEWMAN's Ridge were named for other members of the company. They crossed the mountains through Cumberland Gap into the Kentucky country and all agreed that WALDEN should name the gap, which he did calling it Cumberland for his former home in Cumberland County, Virginia.

"On their return the following year they crossed the Blue Ridge Mountains at Flower's Gap in Franklin County, and found few settlers west of the mountains, the murderous attacks of the Indians having driven them eastward and southward.

"In the year of 1764 the BLEVINs went up into Kentucky and hunted near Crab-Tree Orchard on Rock Castle Creek, where they found the game so plentiful that they continued to hunt there for several years. Daniel BOONE, who was living on the Yadkin, came among the hunters that year, saying that he was employed by the Henderson Company to explore the country. Henry SKAGS was afterwards employed by the HENDERSONs for the same purpose. Draper [note 19] said of SKAGGS that he and his brothers Charles and Richard were a family of noted hunters, and nothing but hunters, who kept pace with the advancing wave of settlements. He described SKAGGS as "possessing a large bony frame, he was bold, enterprising and fearless."

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In the winter of 1771 Henry SKAGGS and a man named KNOX made a station and hunted in Greene County, Kentucky. One day when absent from the station on a hunt their camp was plundered by a half-breed Cherokee named Will EMERY. When they returned to find the result of their winter's labors gone, they carved on a tree, "Fifteen hundred skins gone to ruination." SKAGGS [note 20] and his brother later settled in this section of Kentucky, where they lived to a ripe old age." (Note 15: Virginia Mag. History, v.7, p.250. Note 19: Draper's Manuscripts. Note 20: Cyclopedia of Biography, v.5, p.813, says of the SKAGGS family that they were of Scotch descent and many of them settled in Maryland.) --Maud Carter Clement, History of Pittsylvania County, Virginia (Lynchburg, VA: J.P. Bell Co., 1929; transcribed by Ancestry.com), Chapter 7, The Cherokee War--Western Exploration, pp.90-91.

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"The Kentucky Explorer" magazine, October, 1999, issue that features an article about the efforts of the South Central Kentucky Historical Society to mark forgotten cemeteries in the area. This article has a photo of society's volunteers who have placed a sign on or near the burial place of HENRY SKAGGS, the Long Hunter, located on the property of former Kentucky Governor LOUIE NUNN, at Hiseville-Park, Ky. The site is in Barren Co., Ky., and near Green Co., Ky., where HENRY SKAGGS and CHARLES SKAGGS' wills are filed. HENRY SKAGGS m. MARY THOMPSON, d/o JOHN and MARY UNKNOWN THOMPSON.

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**General Notes**

1. Sons of James and Rachel listed in the Pioneer Baptist Church Records of South-Central Kentucky and the Upper Cumberland of Tennessee 1799-1899 by C. P. Cawthorn & N. L. Warnell copyright 1985. Portions received from Brenda Harper 3/15/97.

2. Henry was one of the early Long Hunters of 1761-1775 of which Kentucky Historians have recorded much about. He was considered very prominent in the settlement of early Kentucky.

3. Henry was at the present site of Bowling Green, Kentucky in 1775.

4. In the fall of 1779 Henry Skaggs started up from Tennessee for his usual Winter hunt. Indians attacked, stole the game his party had collected and frightened most of the hunters back to camp, leaving Henry alone with his young son and another hunter named Sinclair. Shortly after the three of them started further into the wilderness, Sinclair drowned in the icy Green River. Then young Skaggs took sick and died. The old hunter left his son's body in a hollow log, the ground being frozen too hard for a proper burying........which son?

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When the gospel was first sent to the Green River section of Kentucky, the land was wild and uncultivated. Alas! for the poor Baptists, death at the hands of a lawless savage was an ever present chill on the hearts of the living, and who could tell whether it would continue to advance with the quiet of a blight, or vet burst upon them with the fury of a tempest?

A great number of these first Baptists were among the "Long Hunters" who came from the "Baptist Valley" area of Southwest Virginia.'

These families were the forerunners of the "foot-washing" Baptists which subsequently moved into Kentucky and established many of the Baptist Churches of the frontier land. Among the leaders was the Skaggs family consisting of Rev. James Skaggs and his brothers Henry, Richard, Jacob, Charles, Moses, and William. These were the early "Long Hunters" of 1761-1775 of which the Kentucky historians have recorded much about. Henry and Richard were particularly prominent. Henry Skaggs was at the present site of Bowling Green. Kentucky in 1775. A brother, Moses, was killed by Indians on his second trip into Kentucky.

Richard Skaggs had three sons named Shadrach, Mashack, and Abednego. It was Mashack who was killed by Indians on the creek named after him in present Monroe County, Kentucky.

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The men who lived on the frontier took protracted hunting trips into Kentucky, hence the name "Long Hunters." Later when Daniel Boone led a group of Yadkin farmers into Kentucky, they used a wilderness track referred to as the "Skaggs Trace." This track became a part of the Boone Trace and Wilderness Road that led the pioneers into Kentucky from Virginia.

The first settlement of the Green River Baptists was in Green County in 1780, and was known as Skaggs Station. It was established by Rev. James Skaggs and was the third station in what is now Green County, Ky.; Glovers Station having been established in the Fall of 1779, and Pitman's Station in March of 1780.
[HenrySkaggsMaryThompson.ftw]

---------------------------

From The SW Virginian, Vol. 1, #3, Wise, VA, page 29, transcribed by Rhonda S. Roberson. This is a petition asking the House of Delegates of VA to place a line "fixed along Clinch Mt. and Montgomery line to the Carolina line" to separate them from Washington Co. These inhabitants include those of Clinch River, Mocason Creek, Powels Valley, north branch of Holstein River, and "others." Dated Dec. 9, 1785. Washington Co., VA, is in the far southern section of VA, just before the border into TN and not far from NC. Alexander SEAL, James SHEWMAKER, John SHOEMAKER, John SHORT, Thoms. SHORT, David SKAGGS, Solomon SKAGGS, John SKAGGS, Henry SKAGGS, Edwd. SMITH, H. SMITH, John SMITH, Enius SMITH, Elijah SMITH, Wm. SMITH, Wm. SMITH, Eli SMITH, Evens SMITH, Jr., Edward SMOTE, Tom STACY, Masheck STACY, Meshack STACY, Sammuel STALLARD, Edward STAPLETON, Edw. STAPLETON, Isaiah STILLS, Yeah STILS?, John TATE, Thomas TATE, Robert TATE, Jr., Rober TATE, Sr., Richd THOMPSON, John THOMPSON, Wm. THOMPSON, John THOMSON, Saml VANCE, John VANDYETHE,

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Cyrus Edwards, in the book Stories of Early Days,page 208. related that Henry Skaggs "The Long Hunter" came to the home of his grandfather, Cader Edwards, in Nov. 1765, asked for lodging and remained until spring, (Cader Edwards lived next door to Henry's brother Richard Skaggs). This was repeated every winter threafter until 1769, when Henry Skaggs went with a group of explorers of 1770-1771 trapping beaver at the big beaver dam on Barren River, near the big spring at the Adolphus Depp (now Dr. Nelson Pott) place. Cyrus Edwards thought that this was the first arrival of the white man in Barren County. Henry Skaggs told Cader Edwards that if anything ever happened to him to "bury me high on a hill in the woods I loved, wherever I die." After a wild turkey hunt he spent the night at his friend Mr. Bishop's A sudden illness overcame him and he died there. A huge tree stands as a sentinel at the head of the grave, not far from Mr. Bishop's house. In 1921 his grave stood in the residence of J.W. Irwin, near what is now the Park Post Office. He did not get along well with his wife and would stay out on long hunts for up to 2 years before returning home. He left his wife in good circumstances when she was old, with their children living close by and four slaves to do the work, she was well cared for.

SKAGGS FRONTIERSMAN
From 1658 to 1761 very little has been found about the migrations of the various Skaggs families. However, near the end of that period records of their living in southwestern Virginia begin to appear. After 1761 they are found in the vanguard of the slow but steady stream of pioneers into Tennessee and Kentucky.

Robert L. Kincaid,in his book, The Wilderness Road, tells about the Long Hunters who pushed farther and farther west after 1761, traveling long distances in unexplored country for months at a time in their quest for pelts which could be sold or traded at home. In the meantime it was up to their wives and children to do the farming and gardening.

One of the early leaders in these hunting expeditions was a man by the name of Walden. On one of his first trips he was accompanied by his father-in-law, William Blevins, his brother-in-law, Jack Blevins, HENRY SKAGGS, Walter Newman, Charles Cox and about a dozen other trained woodsmen. The party spent about eighteen months on the trip and ranged as far as the vicinity of Cumberland Gap. The area was a hunter's paradise abounding in deer, buffalo, beaver, otter and mink and small game for their daily food supply. They brought home a large supply of pelts and hides.

In 1763, Walden and his party again went on a Long Hunt, passing through Cumberland Gap this time and going as far as the present town of Crab orchard, Kentucky. The news of their successful hunts soon spread and led others to venture on similar trips. In June, 1769, a party of hunters gathered at Fort Chiswell as the starting point for their hunt. Among the leaders was RICHARD SKAGGS. They went as far as present Nashville, Tennessee. In the following year, 1770, a large party passed through Cumberland Gap, ranging as far as Green River and the Barrens in Kentucky where many Skaggs later settled.

In May, 1769, Daniel Boone and his party followed the Wilderness Road through Cumberland Gap into Kentucky but at Hazel Patch turned northward to the site of Boonesborough which he would later establish as a settlement. By the year 1775 the branch of the Wilderness Road that pointed toward Louisville, Kentucky was known as the SKAGGS TRACE and was named for three Irish brothers, HENRY, CHARLES AND RICHARD SKAGGS. Long Hunters who had spent much time in the region according to Kincaid, page 113. There is also a stream known as SKAGGS CREEK.

During the Revolutionary War, the Indian allies of the British waged war against the Kentucky settlers. Beginning in 1777 the fighting was bitter bringing much loss of life and hardships to the people. Several Skaggs were in the war, at least three of them being killed. Virginia and Kentucky Skaggs in the war included JAMES, JOHN, RICHARD, WILLIAM, ARCHIBALD, HENRY, CHARLES, MOSES, JACOB, JORRE AND AARON [SKAGGS] and a few with the same names as some of the above. MOSES and AARON [SKAGGS] are said to have been killed and also a PETER SKAGGS. Several of them received pensions later according to the records.

The Draper Manuscripts include a statement that "A number of Skaggs brother came to Green County, Kentucky, most of them very early, long before any settlement, and then they became the earliest settlers. JAMES, HENRY, JOHN, CHARLES AND RICHARD SKAGGS left records in Green County, while MOSES AND AARON [SKAGGS] were said to have been killed there." Note: In 1798 Barren County was split off Green County.

The Skaggs brothers, sons of JAMES AND RACHEL SKAGGS are believed to have been HENRY, CHARLES, RICHARD, JAMES,JR., AARON, MOSES and possibly JOHN SKAGGS. Many of their descendants still live in Kentucky but as early as 1820 there were three Skaggs in Indiana and at least one is known definitely to be from Kentucky.

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Deeds:
21 July/24 Aug 1784, A 325, Henry Skaggs and Mary Skaggs, to William Grayson, 100 acres, (Monetary terms), Little River, branch of Woods River; witness, James McCorkle, John Kirk, Robert Currin, John Grayson, and William Christian. (Montgomery County, Christianburg Courthouse)

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Henry, the Long Hunter, died 1809-1810, and his will is recorded in Green Co., Book 1, p. 48. In W. R. Jillson's Kentucky Land Grants, Henry SKAGGS obtained 400 acres on Pitman Creek, Nelson Co., March 15, 1791. Pitman Creek begins in present-day Taylor County and runs southwest into Green County where it empties into the Green River. He lived in the northeast sector of present day Green Co.


HENRY SKAGGS WILL
5 APRIL 1809
GREEN COUNTY, KENTUCKY
Will Book 1 pp. 56-57

Will

In the name of God Amen, I HENRY SKAGGS of the County of Green and state of Kentucky do make this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following (To wit) I leave all my Estate both real and personal to my beloved Wife to be enjoyed by her during her life, and after her death, the tract of Land wher on I now live I give to my Grand son JOHN SKAGGS son of JAMES SKAGGS; my Negro man Bob I give to my son DAVID SKAGGS; my negro woman Lucy I give to SYLVIA ROARK; I give to my Daughter SARAH SKAGGS a negro girl Rachel; I give to my son JAMES SKAGGS the rest of my negroes, jinney, and all her Children except (Rachel) and her further increase should she have any during either my life time or the lifetime of my Wife. The ballance of my Estate is to be sold, and I give one Dollar to STEPHEN SKAGGS, the Ballance to be equally divided amongst my Children hereafter named, SOLOMON SKAGGS, LUCY STACY, RACHEL RAY, NANCY D SPANE,

POLLY COMBS what I have here left to each of my Children is in addition to what I have heretofore given Lastly I do appoint my son JAMES SKAGGS and ELIAS BARBEE Executors to this my last Will Revoking all others heretofore
made by me. In testamony where of I here unto set my hand and seal this fifth day of April in the year of our Lord 1809.

HENRY SKAGGS (mark) (seal)
Signed, sealed and puplished in the presence of

ELIAS BARBEE x
JOHN BARBEE x
LARKIN DURRET x
JAMES RAFITY x
WILLIAM BARBEE x

At a County Court held for Green County on the 4th Monday in december1810. This will was produced into Court and proven by the oath off LARKIN DURRET, JAMES RAFFIRTY and JOHN BARBEE and ordered to be recorded which is done accordingly by Clerk JOHN BARRET DC Parents: James Skaggs and Rachel.

He was married to Mary Thompson about 1756. [gcfamilies.GED]

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CONTESTING THE WILL OF HENRY SKAGGS

June 1815 Green Co., KY Circuit Court Case #5389 Green Circuit and County and Commonwealth of Kentucky to the honorable ___ Judges in chancery sitting

Your orator Peter D. SPAIN and his wife Nancy D. SPAIN and Reubin ROARK and Silvy ROARK his wife and William Combs and Mary Combs his wife and Thomas RAY and Rachael RAY his wife humbly complaining showeth to your honors that Henry SKAGGS departed this life leaving your Orators heirs to part of his estate and that the deceased intended by a will to have devised his estate in such a manner as it might be well understood and for that purpose appointed Elias BARBEE and James SKAGGS in said will to be his Executors and to act for the benefit of all the legatees named in said will but said will either being so uninteligible as that said Executor could not act properly on said will or otherwise they have so mistaken said will so as to do great injustice to your Orators and have acted contrary to the last will and wish of the testator and your Orators veryly believes that the will is so vague and uncertain that it cannot be acted upon so as to do justice to the parties according to the true intent and meaning of the testator which will and the inventory and appraisment of said Estate your Orators prays may be taken and read as a part of this bill and that the said Executors Elias BARBEE and James SKAGGS may be made Defendants to this bill and that your honors may by a decree of your honorable Court make nul and void said will or otherwise if your honors should be of opinion that the said will can be understood so as to be acted upon your orators prays your honors to compell the said Defendants to do justice according to the true intent and meaning of the Deceased and compell the different legatees to act according to the justice of the case, to wit, David SKAGGS, Solomon SKAGGS, Stephen SKAGGS, John STACY and Lucy STACY his wife all of whom your Orators prays may be made defendants to this bill and your Orators farther states that Mary SKAGGS the wife of the deceased was left in possession of all the estate real and personal and has so waisted the estate for want of proper care and through neglect so as to deprive your orators from the benefit of their part of the estate when the said (Nancy is crossed out) Mary SKAGGS who is also made defendant hereunto was left in full possession of one tract of land the rents of which would have more than doubly supported her and also one valuable negro fellow named Bob whose labour alone with good management would have supported her and one other negro man named Ned whose labour was entirely sufficient to have supported her and your orators farther states that the Deceased was none indebted and left sveral other negroes sufficient to support her and her daughter Sally SKAGGS who is also made defendant hereunto all of which land and Negroes are now and have been in the possession and in the use of said defendant (Nancy is crossed out) Mary SKAGGS and if the will is not revoked the land to remain hers during her life and then to descend to John SKAGGS son of James SKAGGS which John SKAGGS is also made Defendant hereunto. And your orators would farther state that if the will is not made nul and void that they were and are entitled to a large share of the property of the Deceased as will appear from the will and Inventory and the right of the increase of one Negro woman which at present is three negroes all of which goods have been sold at publick sale and otherwise made way with except the three Negroes mentioned as the increase and they have in no accounted to your Orators for any part of the estate when it was the wish and desire of the testator that the said defendant (Nancy is crossed out) Mary his wife should be freely and honourably supported and that proper care shold be taken by the Executors and the defendant (Nancy is crossed out) Mary and that after her support the balance should be for your orators and that nothing should go to waste, but your orators state that there is a total neglect and in the defendant Mary SKAGGS want of care which is much to the Damages of your orators.

All which actings and Doings are contrary to equity and good conscience and tend greatly to injure your orators in tender consideration whereof and as your orators are with out remedy at commonlaw and only relievable at equity before your honors where frauds are detected and hardships relieved against may it please your honors the premis considered to grant the Commonwealths writ of subpoena ad responendum by which the defendants may be compelled on their corporal oaths true and perfect answers to make to all and singular the premises as perfectly and as fully as if they were again repeated and interogated and that the Honourable Court may appoint Commissioners to adjust and settle the said estate of said estate and that by a final Decree of the Honourable Court they may make nul and void the said will as being too vague to be understood so as to do justice or otherwise Decree to your Orators such part of the estate as to them does justly belong and grant an injunction all waste of said estate in further granting to the defendant Mary SKAGGS the wife of the deceased a full and honourable support out of the estate and such other and farther relief as to equity doth belong and your orators as in duty bound shall ever pray.

John EMERSON
 
SKAGGS, Henry (The Long Hunter) (I4559)
 
137 "The life of Daniel Boone," written by Lyman C Draper, LL.D., Henry, Charles and Richard Skaggs, and three other brothers were grandsons of an Irishman who fled from Ireland (Londonderry) in 1688-89, when so many of the Scotch-Irish race emigrated to the shores of the New World.

Known marriages for Richard's children:
1789 March 12, M. Skeggs md. Sarah Gumm, Nelson Co., KY.
1791 Sept., 27, Shadrack Skaggs md. Lydia Gumm, Nelson Co., KY.

1792, Green Co., KY, formed from Nelson Co. & Lincoln Co.

1793 June 14, Sarah Skaggs md. Andrew Clement, Green Co., KY.
1793 Aug. 1, Abednego Skaggs md. Catherine Hoback, Green Co., KY.
1797 May 20, Henry Skaggs md. Sally Laisfield, Green Co., KY.

1798, Barren Co., KY, formed from Green Co. & Warren Co.

1807 Dec. 7, Rhody Logsdon md. John Q. Phelps, Barren Co., KY.
1817 May 14, Rebecca Skaggs md. William Warnel, Barren Co., KY. --all from Kentucky Marriages before 1850 (Ancestry.com)

1817, Betsy Skaggs md. Andrew B. Kelly, Green Co., KY. --LDS IGI

Additional Skaggs marriages in Barren Co., KY (Ancestry.com)
1812 April 2, Henry Skaggs md. Liddy Skaggs
1817 May 14, Rebekah Skaggs md. William McVett
1817 Dec. 5, Charles Skaggs md. Polly Wilcox
1819 March 9, John Skaggs md. Edney Innis
1822 April 26, Rachel Skaggs md. Rials Jefreys
1825 Jan. 6, Sarah Skaggs md. Willis Hind

Deposition of WILLIAM RATLIFF (27 April 1836 at the home of WILLIAM SKAGGS, Aleck Fork of Pitman Creek). I was acquainted with MOSES SKAGGS of Green County, KY. He had 4 sisters, to wit: SUSANNAH, wife of RICHARD WHIT; LYDIA, wife of MATTHIAS HARMON, ELIZABETH "Betsy," wife of JOHN HANKINS; and NANCY, wife of WILLIAM MERIDY. I was quite intimate with them in Virginia. I knew them before they married. MOSES had a brother named JOHN SKAGGS. MOSES died at his house in Green County about 40 years ago. He never had any children that I knew of. RICHARD WHIT and wife, MATTHIAS HARMON and wife, and JOHN HANKINS and wife all lived in Virginia. . . I knew the brothers of MOSES SKAGGS. They were HENRY, JAMES, CHARLES, JOHN, RICHARD and JACOB SKAGGS. I knew them in Kentucky and they all raised large families. . . I knew HENRY SKAGGS, son of RICHARD.

Deposition of FRANCES SAMPLES (27 April 1836). I was familiar with MOSES SKAGGS who died in Green County about 40 years ago. He had 4 sisters, to wit: SUSANNAH, wife of RICHARD WHIT; LYDIA, wife of MATTHIAS HARMAN; ELIZABETH, wife of JOHN HANKINS, and NANCY, wife of WILLIAM MERIDY. They lived in Virginia. When I knew them, MOSES had 6 brothers: HENRY, JOHN, JAMES, CHARLES, RICHARD and JACOB.
http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ky/green/estates/skaggs1.txt
http://www.getnet.com/~cingram/f614.htm

Wanda Sparkman to Skaggs-L, April 4, 2000: Per Richard Skaggs will, Dec. 10, 1818, Barren Co., KY, he had the following living children: John, Rhoda Phelps, Abednego, Sarah Clemmens, Henry, Elizabeth Kelly, and Liddy Skaggs. Sons Shadrack and Meshack Skaggs had died by 1818.

1821, will of Richard Skaggs, Barren Co., KY, Book 2, p.256. --Kentucky Wills, 1700-1851

Sons of James and Rachel listed in the Pioneer Baptist Church Records of South-Central Kentucky and the Upper Cumberland of Tennessee 1799-1899 by C. P. Cawthorn & N. L. Warnell copyright 1985.

"When the gospel was first sent to the Green River section of Kentucky, the land was wild and uncultivated. Alas! for the poor Baptists, death at the hands of lawless savage was an ever present chill on the hearts of the living, and who could tell whether it would continue to advance with the quiet of a blight, or vet burst upon them with the fury of a tempest?

"A great number of these first Baptists were among the "Long Hunters" who came from the "Baptist Valley" area of SouthWest Virginia. These families were the forerunners of the "foot-washing" Baptists which subsequently moved into Kentucky and established many of the Baptist Churches of the frontier land. Among the leaders was the Skaggs family consisting of Rev. James Skaggs and his brothers Henry, Richard, Jacob, Charles, Moses and William. These were the early "Long Hunters" of 1761-1755 of which the Kentucky historians have recorded much about. Henry and Richard were particularly prominent. Henry Skaggs was at the present site of Bowling Green, Kentucky in 1775. A brother Moses was killed by Indians on his second trip into Kentucky.

Richard Skaggs had 3 sons named Shadrach, Mashack and Abendnego. It was Mashack who was killed by Indians on the creek named after him in present Monroe County, Kentucky.
The men who lived on the frontier took protracted hunting trips into Kentucky, hence the name "Long Hunters" later when Daniel Boone led a group of Yadkin farmers into Kentucky, they used a wilderness track referred to as the "Skaggs Trace". This track became a part of the Boone Trace and Wilderness Road that led the pioneers into Kentucky from Virginia.

"The first settlement of the Green River Baptists was in Green County in 1780, and was known as Skaggs station. It was established by Rev. James Skaggs and was the third station in what is now Green county, Kentucky. Glovers station having been established in the Fall of 1779 and Pitman's Station in March of 1780. In March of 1780, James Skaggs Station was broken up and burned by the Indians. Rev. James Skaggs daughter was killed and scalped."

1757/1759 Richard Skaggs, Isaac Skaggs and James Skaggs are list as being in Capt. Dogworthy's company "O" during the French and Indian War, in History of Fredrick County, By T. C. Williams. They all enlisted the same day and were at Braddock's defeat 1769 June.

Richard Skaggs list as being on a long hunt in Kentucky_ (Collins/Leslie)1783/1786 Richard Skaggs listed on Greenbrier County Tax payers_Draper said of Henry Skaggs - That he and his brothers Charles Skaggs and Richard Skaggs was a family of noted hunters and nothing but hunters who kept pace with the advanceing settelments. Richard Skaggs with Contintal Line Regiment in Virginia - Richard Skaggs was with William Skaggs, David Skaggs and Joseph Skaggs and received land grants in Barren County, Kentucky south of Green River south of Lick Creek on Lick Branch, a tributary of Blue Spring Creek. 
SKAGGS, Richard (I4569)
 
138 "The life of Daniel Boone," written by Lyman C Draper, LL.D., Henry, Charles and Richard Skaggs, and three other brothers were grandsons of an Irishman who fled from Ireland (Londonderry) in 1688-89, when so many of the Scotch-Irish race emigrated to the shores of the New World.

This grandfather would be Richard Skaggs.
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SKAGGS, Richard (I4574)
 
139 "The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography", Volume 7, pub. 1897

DOAK, Samuel, founder and first president of Washington College, Tennessee (1795-1818), was born in Augusta County, Va., Aug. 1, 1749, son of Samuel and Jane (Mitchel) Doak. His parents, natives of Ireland, and of Scotch extraction, emigrated to America early in the last century, settling in Chester county, Pa., and later removing to Augusta county, Va. His father was a farmer, and the son's early life was hampered by poverty, although with an unquenchable thirst for knowledge he struggled manfully for an education.

At the age of sixteen he began the study of Latin under a Mr. Alexander, probably, Archibald, grandfather of the famous Rev. Dr. Archibald Alexander, who was at that time teaching school in this neighborhood, and in 1773 he entered Princeton College, where he was graduated in 1775. He at once began the study of theology, and was licensed to preach by the Hanover (Va.) presbytery, Oct. 31, 1777. He began his work among the frontier settlements of southwestern Virginia, in Washington county, and later at the Holston settlement, now part of Sullivan county, Tenn., where he remained two years.

While in search of a more promising field of usefulness, early in 1780, he met some settlers in the neighborhood of Salem, Tenn., who crowded about him and requested a sermon. Using his horse as a pulpit, he delivered so pleasing and helpful a discourse that they forthwith importuned him to remain among them. Here he remained and purchased a farm, lie immediately gathered the pioneer families under his ministry and their children under his tuition, forming the Salem Congregation. He built a log schoolhouse, and in 1783 obtained a charter from the legislature of North Carolina, which then embraced that portion of Tennessee; and again in 1785 he obtained another charter from the legislature of the stale of Franklin, in session at Jonesborough (now in Washington countv, Tenn.), on both occasions giving it the name "Martin Academy" in honor of Gov. Alexander Martin of North Carolina. Although there remains no record of his work in the school during the first twelve years of its existence, many young men educated by him subsequently became useful and eminent. One of them. Dr. J. G. M. Ramsey, in his "Annals of Tennessee" says that it was not only it the " first literary institution ever established in the Mississippi valley west of the Alleghanies," but also "for many years the only, and for still more the principal seat of learning in the western country."

During this period, however, Dr. Doak had continued as pastor of the Salem Church, which was one of the first in this region, and had also organized a number of other churches among the settlers. By an act of the legislature of the "Territory of the United Slates of America, South of the River Ohio," dated July 8, 1795, the school was chartered as a college, empowered to grant academic degrees; and in honor of George Washington, then for the second time president of the United States, it was called Washington College. From the minutes of the first meeting of the board of trustees, held July 23, 1795, it appears that the academy had received 420 acres of land on the Doe river from Col. Waightstill Avery, besides numerous contributions of money, and later Alexander Mathes donated a valuable tract of fifty acres ad joining the property of Dr. Doak, where the college building then stood, which is the site of the modern institution. In 1798 while in the East as commissioner of the general assembly, Dr. Doak collected the nucleus of a library, which he transported 500 miles across the mountains on pack horses; and in the same year the Avery lands were sold and the proceeds expended in globes, maps and other equipments. Dr. Doak resigned in 1818 after presiding over the institution for thirty five years, and soon after removed to Green county, Tenn., within the bounds of Mt. Bethel Church, where he aided his second son, Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak, in conducting Tuscirtum Academy, chartered as Tusculum College in 1844.

In character, Dr. Doak was possessed of rare firmness, dignity and decision', a natural leader of men and a great organizer. Through all the perils and hardships of pioneer life, he remained true to his noble purpose, and justly merits the title "apostle of learning and religion in the West." As a preacher he was original, bold, forcible, even entertaining; and as a teacher he was thoroughly well qualified, a good disciplinarian and a master in Latin, Greek and metaphysics. His creed was thoroughly Calvinistlc, and he taught and propounded it with an earnestness and lucidity calculated to fix its great truths upon the minds of the many young men trained by him for the ministry.

He was on several occasions delegate and commissioner of his synod, and in 1784 was a member of the constitutional convention of the proposed state of Franklin. He at that time furnished a clause providing for a university to be established by legislative enactment before 1787, and "to be endowed liberally." The degree of D.D. was conferred on him by both Washington and Greenville colleges in 1818. Dr. Doak was married in 1776 or '77 to Esther, daughter of Rev. John Montgomery of Virginia, and had two sons and four daughters. He died in Greene County, Tenn., Dec. 12, 1829.  
DOAK, Rev. Samuel (I5736)
 
140 "Thirty-five years before these first McNitts arrived, however, John McKnitt of Ulster Province settled on a 1,000 acre tract called the Strand in Somerset County, Maryland. Two sons, ROBERT (b 1685) and JOHN (b 1687) were born there. John later moved to Cecil County, Maryland and son John McKnitt II acquired the Strand. Other descendants included John McKnitt III and John McKnitt IV who, according to Cecil County records, amended his name to - John McKnight! McKnitt, John Jr. (I10663)
 
141 "Thomas Jefferson Melton, married Wealthia Johnson, of Buckingham. They resided at the old Omohundro place. Three children."
Source: Fluvanna County And Its People, Notes by Rev. B. L. Ancell, M.A., D.D. p. 158 
Family F10503
 
142 "Virginia Births and Christenings, 1853-1917 p104," John Pack 26 Sep 1871 Clinch River, Tazewell, Virginia Parents: C.C. and Hannah Pack.

Death certificate has his YOB as 1872. His daughter, Madge Pack Hutchison was the informant. 
PACK, John (I2929)
 
143 "Virginia Deaths and Burials, 1853-1912." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010
Name: H C Owens
Birth Date: abt 1847
Birth Place: Russell, Virginia
Death Date: 9 Nov 1883
Death Place: Russell, Virginia
Death Age: 36
Occupation: Mechanic
Race: White
Marital Status: Married
Gender: Male
Father Name: R. M. Owens
Mother Name: M. A. Owens
Spouse Name: Nancy Owens
FHL Film Number: 2048583 
OWENS, Hiram Craig (I29995)
 
144 "Virginia Deaths and Burials, 1853-1912." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010
Name: Temperance M Branson
Birth Date: abt 1847
Birth Place: Washington, Virginia
Death Date: 1 Sep 1888
Death Place: Castlewoods, Russell, Virginia
Death Age: 41
Race: White
Marital Status: Married
Gender: Female
Father Name: Able Humpreys
Mother Name: Margaret Humpreys
Spouse Name: Wm. J. Branson
FHL Film Number: 2048583 
Humphrey, Temperance (I30202)
 
145 "Virginia Deaths and Burials, 1853-1912." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010.
Name: Sarah Martha Mc Clung
Birth Date: abt 1847
Birth Place: Rockbridge, Virginia
Death Date: 10 Dec 1892
Death Place: Brownsburg, Rockbridge, Virginia
Death Age: 45
Race: White
Marital Status: Married
Gender: Female
Father Name: Samuel Patterson
Mother Name: Catherine Patterson
Spouse Name: B. F. Mc Clung
FHL Film Number: 2048583 
Patterson, Sarah Martha (Sallie) (I32457)
 
146 "Virginia Deaths and Burials, 1853-1912." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010.
Name: Matilda Burress
Birth Date: abt 1863
Birth Place: Tazewell, Virginia
Death Date: 3 Nov 1896
Death Place: Cavatts Creek, Tazewell, Virginia
Death Age: 33
Race: White
Marital Status: Married
Gender: Female
Spouse Name: J. W. Burress
FHL Film Number: 2048586


Tazewell County Death Register, Maiden Springs District, Line 7

Name of Deceased: Matilda Burress Race: White Sex: Female Date of Death: November 3, 1896 Place of Death: Cavatts Creek, Tazewell County, Virginia Cause of Death: Fever Father: Not Given Mother: Not Given Age: 33 Birth Place: Not Given Marital Status: Married Name of Informant: J.W. Burress (Husband)

 
EARLS, Matilda Rose (I3041)
 
147 "Virginia Deaths and Burials, 1853?1912." Index. FamilySearch
Name: Patsy Morris
Birth Date: abt 1823
Birth Place: Greene, Virginia
Death Date: Sep 1893
Death Place: Greene, Virginia
Death Age: 70
Race: White
Gender: Female
FHL Film Number: 2056981 
Morris, Patsy (I29516)
 
148 "Virginia Deaths and Burials, 1853?1912." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010.
Name: Rebecca Jessee Gilly
Birth Date: abt 1849
Birth Place: Russell, Virginia
Death Date: 8 Nov 1894
Death Place: Wise, Virginia
Death Age: 45
Race: White
Marital Status: Married
Gender: Female
Father Name: Clemon B. Jessee
Mother Name: Mary Jessee
Spouse Name: Absolon Gilly
FHL Film Number: 2048588 
Jessee, Rebecca B. (I32856)
 
149 "Virginia Gleanings in England" The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Published by: Virginia Historical Society, Vol. 56, No. 3 (Jul., 1948), pp. 323-327.


 
Bell, Humphrey (I29492)
 
150 "Virginia Revolutionary Pension Applications", Vol. Six; Abstracted and Compiled by John Frederick Dorman.
Page 66

John Berry also served one month as a substitute for his brother-in-law John Tate. This was in the Fall, shortly before Cornwallis' capture in Oct 1781, under Capt. William Tate in Col. Boyer's regiment. He was under Gen. Campbell, a militia officer who died on this expedition. 
Family F11444
 

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